14 Things I Love About the Hyatt Visa

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The World Of Hyatt Credit Card

Hyatt re-launched their credit card last year I took my old one out of the sock drawer, quickly upgraded to the new version, put about $30,000 spend on it. I’ve been spending on the card this year too to help lock in my top tier elite status for the year despite doing my best to limit my travel, and I picked up a couple of free nights in addition to points in the process.

Hyatt’s points are more valuable than other hotel chain points (1 Hyatt point is worth more than 1 Hilton, Marriott, or IHG point), and I find they’re also the easiest to use to secure the best rooms at their hotels. As a result I’m a big fan of the new card.

Here are 14 things I love about the card.

  1. Great initial bonus Earn 50,000 points as a new cardmember: 25,000 after $3000 spend within 3 months of account opening, and an additional 25,000 points after a total of $6000 spend during the first six months (that’s just an average of $1000 per month to earn the full bonus).

    I value Hyatt points at 1.4 cents apiece so see this bonus as worth $700.

    50,000 points is enough for 2 free nights at any Hyatt hotel up to category 6 (or 10 nights at category 1 properties.)


    Looking Out Over the Grand Hyatt Hong Kong

  2. Improved earning for ongoing spend. Here’s the earning structure for this card, which is once again in my view the best card for Hyatt spend.

    • 4 points per dollar Hyatt spend
    • 2 points per dollar restaurants; airline tickets purchased through the airline; fitness club and gym memberships; local transit and commuting including ride share services
    • 1 point per dollar other purchases

    The old card earned 3 points per dollar with Hyatt, at 4 points I’ll use the Hyatt card for Hyatt spend. They’ve added fitness memberships (and this includes class passes) and rideshare. This is the only card I know of that bonuses fitness spend.


    Andaz 5th Avenue

  3. Free anniversary night Like the earlier version of this card you get a free night each anniversary year for a category 1-4 Hyatt property. Most Hyatts fall in those categories. Hyatt has improved the program so that these free nights earn elite status credit.


    Grand Hyatt Tampa Bay

  4. Additional free night each year that you spend $15,000 on the card, valid at a category 1-4 property. That makes putting $15,000 annual spend on the card attractive.


    View of the Petronas Towers from the Category 3 Grand Hyatt Kuala Lumpur

  5. Automatic Discoverist status (first tier elite), which also matches to status in MGM’s M life Rewards program.

  6. Spend helps you earn status you get 5 elite nights every year just for having the card and you earn 2 elite qualifying nights for every $5,000 spent on the card. There is no cap to the number of elite nights you can earn.

    You could earn Globalist (top tier elite) with nothing but credit card spend. Earning Globalist at 60 nights gets you,

    • Best available room at check-in, including standard suites
    • Club lounge access at properties with lounges
    • 4 suite upgrades (for up to 7 nights each) confirmed at booking
    • Full breakfast at properties without club lounges (not just continental breakfast like other chains offer)
    • A dedicated reservations representative to handle all of your Hyatt needs (‘My Hyatt Concierge’)

  7. Free night at 30 elite qualifying nights. The Hyatt program offers you another free night (category 1-4 property) upon reaching 30 nights. Spend on the card helps you earn 30 elite nights.


    Andaz Papagayo Costa Rica

  8. Free night at 60 elite qualifying nights. When you hit top tier Globalist status you earn another free night, this time valid at category 1-7 properties.


    Park Hyatt Vendome, Paris

  9. Additional bonus for earning more qualifying nights. Hyatt awards an additional (choice of) confirmed suite or 10,000 points at each of 70, 80, 90, and 100 nights so spend on this card helps towards those thresholds too. Your credit card spend can put you over one of these thresholds, so you aren’t ‘wasting spend’ when you keep going with this card.

  10. Points are amazing for high-end redemptions. Outside of all-inclusive Miraval restreat the most expensive Hyatt standard room costs 30,000 points whether it’s the Park Hyatt Paris, Sydney, Tokyo, or New York. And there are plenty of high end hotels that cost less. There’s no high season premium or surge pricing like Marriott is introducing either.


    Park Hyatt Hadahaa, Maldives

  11. There are no better points for accessing suites. Hyatt lets you spend extra points for suites, and confirming one is just 60% more than a regular room and a premium suite can be redeemed for double the points of a standard room. They’re also better than any other chains for upgrades, too. 6000 points per night upgrades a qualifying paid stay to a suite, and sa premium suite upgrade can be confirmed at booking for 9000 points if available. No other chain matches that so if you like upgraded accommodations Hyatt points are a valuable tool.

  12. Easy to get more points, just transfer in Chase Ultimate Rewards. You can transfer points to Hyatt from the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card, for instance, so you can generate points from the World Of Hyatt Credit Card and top off your account with other points so you have enough for whatever redemption you want to make.

  13. Points can be combined. Not only can you combine Chase points in your Hyatt account, but you can move Hyatt points between accounts at no charge. So if you get the World Of Hyatt Credit Card and a family member does too, they can give you their points and then you can redeem.

  14. Free nights can be combined for longer stays. The card helps you earn a lot of free nights.
    But what if they’re not enough? If your travel companion gets the card too and earns free nights, just make a few nights’ bookings in their name and a few in yours, back-to-back. I ran into a couple at the Park Hyatt in the Maldives who had each gotten the Hyatt card and redeemed free nights that way.

The World Of Hyatt Credit Card

About Gary Leff

Gary Leff is one of the foremost experts in the field of miles, points, and frequent business travel - a topic he has covered since 2002. Co-founder of frequent flyer community InsideFlyer.com, emcee of the Freddie Awards, and named one of the "World's Top Travel Experts" by Conde' Nast Traveler (2010-Present) Gary has been a guest on most major news media, profiled in several top print publications, and published broadly on the topic of consumer loyalty. More About Gary »

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Editorial note: any opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any card issuer. Comments made in response to this post are not provided or commissioned nor have they been reviewed, approved, or otherwise endorsed by any bank. It is not the responsibility of any advertiser to ensure that questions are answered, either. Terms and limitations apply to all offers.

Comments

  1. “Hyatt’s points are more valuable than other hotel chain points (1 Hyatt point is worth more than 1 Hilton, Marriott, or IHG point)”

    For the Nth time already, that claim is demonstrably false. With the math being trivial, it is just amazing to me how the very simple concept that “the average redemption values of loyalty points currencies in CPP that are peddled all the time cannot be compared across programs without first doing a *points currency conversion*” has managed to trip up virtually every self-anointed ‘travel guru’ for so long.

    The mistake is in thinking of the average redemptions values of points currencies as if they were in ABSOLUTE USD cents, e.g., 1.5 cents is 3 times bigger than 0.5 cent. However, that is NOT what is being compared. Rather, what is being compare are “USD cents *PER* points currency denomination”, which cannot be compared directly without first doing a points currency conversion because… different programs award different number of POINTS for the same number of USD cents spent!!!

    Thus,1.5 cents PER Hyatt point *are worth exactly the same* as 0.5 cent PER Hilton point, when adjusted so that *one earns the same number of points per cent spend* — a conversion factor of about 3 , with is ALL OVER THE PLACE:

    — A HH Diamond earns 20x for hotel spend; a WoH Globalist earns 6.5x: 20/6.5 = ~3

    — Hilton’s $95 AF co-brand CC (Surpass) earns 12x; Hyatt’s $95 AF co-brand CC earns 4x: 12x/4x = 3 [putting the Aspire’s 14x above the rest]

    — Officially Hilton’s top award rate is 95K; Hyatt’s is 30K: 95K/30K = ~3

    — Hilton’s next top award rate is likely to be 120K (see, e.g., WA Maldives or Cabos), Hyatt already has several properties that now cost 40K: 120K/40K = 3

    The factor 3 is not accidental…not any more accidental than Marriott knew to use a conversion factor of 3 between SPG and Marriott points.

    A Hilton property that costs 120K/night in points would cost in cash:
    120K HH * $0.005/HH = $600/night

    A Huatt property that costs 40K/night in points would cost in cash:
    40K HH * $0.015/HH = $600/night

    See? Exactly the same monetary value.

    Bottom line: 1.5 cents PER Hyatt point have exactly the same purchasing power as 0.5cent PER Hilton point. Therefore the claim that “Hyatt’s points are more valuable than other hotel chain points…” is bogus. Can we now stop making it once and for all?

    G’day

  2. @DCS: I think anyone seriously using points knows Hyatt points are superior to other chain point currencies.
    It’s tough to find many Hilton properties getting 1/2 cent value. Not unless you use 5th night free. You have to cherry pick to make your valuations come out.
    But it is easy to find many Hyatt properties at 2 cents per point or better.
    I think you are quite naive in your foolish argument.

  3. @Fathis sez: “I think anyone seriously using points knows Hyatt points are superior to other chain point currencies.”

    Well, “anyone seriously using points” does not know better and is wrong as I showed above, but that quite likely just went over your head. In fact, I am not surprised that you are as confused as travel bloggers have been for years, or that you ignored the proof in front of you and simply regurgitated the same false claim.

    then added: “But it is easy to find many Hyatt properties at 2 cents per point or better.. I think you are quite naive in your foolish argument”: The truth of the matter is that you are not qualified to call “foolish” an argument that you are clearly less about.

    Finding Hyatt properties at 2cpp is no easier than finding Hilton properties at 2cpp/3 = 0.67cpp, which would be the equivalent, especially on a 5-night award stay, which is perhaps the most valuable perk in hotel loyalty that Hyatt does even offer.

    In fact, I have a 5-night award stay booked at the brand new and highly aspirational Waldorf Astoria Maldives Itaafushi around New Year that will get me a redemption value of ~4cpp ($20K value), which would be like getting a whopping 12cpp at a Hyatt property. That you think 2cpp in Hyatt points is great is clear evidence that you are clueless and not qualified to call my argument “naive”.

    G’day.

  4. I have the old Hyatt credit card. Does Chase allow you to have both the old Hyatt credit card and the new one too?

  5. I’m confused how the card helps you get the “best room” at the property? If using points, I have only seen the lowest tiered room offered. Not sure how your statement applies if using cash, either.

  6. No annual free night level hotels in London or Manhattan. This used to be a keeper, but with Hyatt’s limited footprint, it’s now on the edge, at best.

    Sign-up bonuses always look great-free is free. But worth a 5/24 slot? Mmmm-not for me.

  7. @DCS: “For the Nth time already, that claim is demonstrably false.”

    Except that you, yet again, had to bend the definition of value in order to make this supposed claim.

    Not everything that bloggers post is an attack on your beloved Hilton, DCS.

  8. Why Hyatt is not worth my spend/loyalty after 1 year of experience being a Hyatt cardholder:

    1. Many of their desirable properties play games with reward availability (either none are shown a la “black out dates” or require a minimum number of nights booked).

    2. Needlessly complicated program and rules. Why are there base points and nights? Why can’t I use upgrade certificates on award nights? It only appears to be getting more complicated with their recent acquisitions…

    3. Small footprint of hotels limits earning and redemption opportunities, even before the reindeer games they play (#1).

    Bottomline – Not sure why anyone puts up with Hyatt given their games, complicated rules, and slim options. We choose to vacation where and when we want, not when and where there is a Hyatt (with reward availability for the length of stay we want).

  9. @Mike — I will address you here just this once to make my position clear vis a vis you, as I did at OMAAT last week. I see that you have not yet stopped hounding me. But if you are going to persist, you might try to say something that makes sense.

    There is nothing in what you just stated above that nullifies my math. I bent no definition to support my claim. I provided the *correct* definition. The CPP is just that, cent PER POINT, a relative rather than an absolute measure. It is not just cents, the US currency, which can be compared directly. It is cents PER POINT, the value of points, which *cannot be* compared directly. Do you get the difference?

    If for $100 Hilton awards 2,000 points or requests 95K points for a room that costs $600 in cash, and for the same $100 Hyatt awards 650 points or requests 30 points for a room that costs $600 in cash, then cents PER Hilton points and cents PER Hyatt points are different quantities BY DEFINITION, like two completely different currencies (e.g., USD and Euro.) To compare USD to a Euro you need a conversion factor (0.91 Euro = 1 USD at the moment). It’s exactly the same as for points currencies. Hilton points and Hyatt points are NOT the same because a different number of them is awarded or required for the *same* money!!!

    Lastly, the truth has nothing to do with attacks on any loyalty program. Here, Hilton, Marriott and IHG currencies were claimed as inferior; not just Hilton. I would have stated the same thing even if Hilton had not been mentioned.

    If you are going to keep hounding me, then the least you can do is make arguments that debunk my claims or make sense. The converse is known as ‘stalking.’

    Goodbye

  10. @DCS: “If you are going to keep hounding me, then the least you can do is make arguments that debunk my claims or make sense. The converse is known as ‘stalking.’”

    First of all, get over yourself. As has been already pointed out to you, you are not the only person who reads both VTFW and OMAAT.

    Second, if you are going to insult other people by telling them that their arguments make no sense, then perhaps you should heed your own advice. After all, the only thing you did (in pointing out that Gary was wrong when he said that a Hyatt point was worth more than a Marriott or Hilton point) is illustrate exactly how he is correct in that argument. The relative purchasing power of any of those currencies does not negate that fact, just as the purchasing power of a British pound does not negate the fact that it, in and of itself, is more valuable than a Euro, a US dollar, or a Ugandan shilling.

    Then again, I’m arguing with someone who is so hellbent on being correct and is so insulted when someone says something he disagrees with, that he resorts to name-calling and other forms of narcissistic rage to defend the so-called “insult.”

    Yt again, DCS, grow up and get help.

  11. Looks like DCS is out of his cave and off his meds again.

    Wish he would go back to “opting out of participating” in this blog.

  12. @Justin – you can use TSUs on award nights…you just can’t use them on promotional certificates.

    If you think Hyatt is bad about “playing games” – may I introduce you to Marriott! Over there, the IT is best in class, customer service is super responsive and always correct, and properties are always available.

    Frankly, Hyatt is a breath of fresh air IMO.

  13. @UA-NYC – Hyatt lost our business when we attempted to book Andaz Maui, Andaz Napa, Hyatt Residence Lake Tahoe, and Hyatt Centric Waikiki in the past year. Standard rooms were available but no award availibility each time. My favorite Hyatt rep response was “That’s unfortunate” and there was nothing they could do. In our time with Hilton, we have never experienced that type of situation. Haven’t stayed at a Marriott post merger for fear of being Bonvoyed.

  14. DCS is correct in that he is saying that, in comparing points programs, one cannot compare just the redemption value of a point, one has to look at what it costs. To use the example above, if a Hyatt room costs one third the number of Hyatt points that a Hilton room costs in IHG points, but a Hyatt point costs three times as much as an IHG point, then points cost of each room, in its respective rewards program, is the same.

    @Gary is wrong that Hyatt points are more valuable. They may be worth 1.4c on redemption (vs. 0.05c for IHG points), but they cost three times as much as IHG points to acquire. @Gary assumes that points and dollars are mutable. If they were, his calculations would be correct.

  15. L3 – don’t fall into the DCS wormhole of getting into earn vs. burn calculation. This and similar articles in the past are simply talking about the value of the respective points in the marketplace once they exist.

    To use an analogy of their respective values, Hyatt = GBP, Marriott = CAD, Hilton = Zimbabwedollar.

  16. @UA-NYC: Your example makes the error in only looking at values even clearer. GBP/USD/CAD are convertable currencies (the case I referenced in the last sentence of my previous answer). Reward program points are not convertable between each other. They are closed systems, so you can’t arbitrage the differences. You have to look points purchasing power within their own program to see if one is worth more than another. Thus, Hyatt (30k points/room night), has rough parity with Hilton (90k points/room night) when Hyatt points cost three times as much as Hilton points. @Gary’s claim that Hyatt points are more valuable is incorrect.

    Put differently, if all the hotel points were obtained for free (i.e. the same price across programs), such as is the case with signup bonuses, then they could be compared solely by looking at the value of points. But, if they cost different amounts across programs (the normal situation) then you have to consider the cost difference.

  17. @L3: “GBP/USD/CAD are convertable currencies (the case I referenced in the last sentence of my previous answer). Reward program points are not convertable between each other.”

    Whether a currency is convertable or not is completely irrelevant. While fiat currencies are convertable and hotel points, by and large, are not, the convertable currencies are still the predominant means of exchange within their respective countries. Sure, there are places that will accept your US dollars in Canada, but a) they’re not going to give you a favorable exchange rate, and b) the odds of that happening are probably significantly lower in, say, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, than they would be in Vancouver or Toronto.

    “Put differently, if all the hotel points were obtained for free (i.e. the same price across programs), such as is the case with signup bonuses, then they could be compared solely by looking at the value of points. But, if they cost different amounts across programs (the normal situation) then you have to consider the cost difference.”

    Which is completely irrelevant also, given Gary’s original statement:

    “Hyatt’s points are more valuable than other hotel chain points (1 Hyatt point is worth more than 1 Hilton, Marriott, or IHG point)”

    Irrespective of how I earn any hotel point (and I hold balances in WoH, Bonvoy, and Honors), there is a value that I will get from them after they have been redeemed. How much value I am able to obtain from each point will depend on how I redeem any of them (since they technically have no value until I redeem them), but given the price differences between the average WoH redemption and the average Marriott or Hilton redemption, each point I have in my WoH balance will, on average, go further than each Hilton point I have.

    Translated – if I had 1 million WoH points and 1 million Honors points, it is incredibly more likely that I would get more redemptions from redeeming the 1 million WoH points than I would get redeeming the 1 million Honors points.

    Gary’s statement, given not only the fact that he was making a 1:1 comparison of each point, but also the general sense of how bloggers and others assign value to travel points, is based purely on a redemption or spend value – what do you get in exchange for each point you use. To that end, how the points are earned is little more than you and DCS moving the goalposts to try and come up with some different definition of “value” than what is intended.

    When this topic comes up, people such as yourself or DCS get butthurt because they might perceive a lower value assignment for Hilton or Marriott as being a slam on the program, when I really don’t think that is what is intended. Using the fiat currency comparison again, it would be like saying that, simply based on the value of the currencies involved, that the Canadian dollar is a “better” or more ideal currency than the Japanese Yen or the South Korean Won, simply because one CAD is worth more on the exchange market than one Yen or one Won.

    The cost of the points and the prices involved in purchasing award redemptions do, indeed, go to great lengths to normalize the absolute values of each program in comparison to each other. To that end, DCS isn’t wrong that, in the end, the programs are pretty similar as a whole. However, that value isn’t what Gary was shooting for, and bringing up those arguments, again, is nothing more than moving the goalposts away from where the original argument was.

  18. @Mike: Stop writing and re-read what others have said. Everything in your long-winded diatribe is either wrong, confused or, your best stuff, irrelevant. In fact, you don’t appear to be tooled-up to handle the debate, so read, don’t write.

  19. @DCS: “Stop writing and re-read what others have said. Everything in your long-winded diatribe is either wrong, confused or, your best stuff, irrelevant. In fact, you don’t appear to be tooled-up to handle the debate, so read, don’t write.”

    Next time, DCS, don’t be so obvious in your attempts to fabricate support by inventing other people to “support” you.

  20. ROTFLMAO!

    @L3 thanks for proving that rather than “falling into the DCS wormhole of getting into earn vs. burn calculation”, you figured it all out on your own, and for an accurate read of the unhinged poster @Mike who, in his malignant obsession with me, @DCS, now thinks you and I are the same person — an insinuation that the forum host who knows everyone’s identity can readily establish to be quite false and, hence, unhinged.

  21. @DCS: “@L3 thanks for proving that rather than “falling into the DCS wormhole of getting into earn vs. burn calculation”, you figured it all out on your own, and for an accurate read of the unhinged poster @Mike who, in his malignant obsession with me, @DCS, now thinks you and I are the same person — an insinuation that the forum host who knows everyone’s identity can readily establish to be quite false and, hence, unhinged.”

    You’re projecting again, DCS/L3.

  22. Totally, certifiably unhinged! And, stop using the term “projecting”, which you clearly misunderstand, misuse and overuse. It is an actual psychoanalytic term with a real meaning, y’know.

  23. @DCS: “(◔_◔)”

    So I guess you’re saying that it’s okay for you to accuse other people of being me (which you’ve done on several occasions), but when you get called out for posting as multiple persons, that person is “unhinged.”

    Your hypocrisy is pretty stunning, you know.

  24. @DCS/L3: “Enough already. Please just go away.”

    Well, I’ve had enough of your projection, gaslighting, and insults, too, but I know you’re never going to do anything about it, much as I wish you would just go away.

  25. A broken record does not begin to describe the obsessive compulsion. For 2+ years, this individual has been going on and on and on about the same thing. One would think that at some point the futility of it all would have become apparent, but it has not and will never become apparent because that *is* this individual’s psychopathology.

  26. @DCS/L3: “A broken record does not begin to describe the obsessive compulsion. For 2+ years, this individual has been going on and on and on about the same thing. One would think that at some point the futility of it all would have become apparent, but it has not and will never become apparent because that *is* this individual’s psychopathology.“

    Refer back to my comments about how DCS/L3 will never cease with the projection, gaslighting, or insults.

  27. Class is now in session

    @Mike claimed: “Translated – if I had 1 million WoH points and 1 million Honors points, it is incredibly more likely that I would get more redemptions from redeeming the 1 million WoH points than I would get redeeming the 1 million Honors points.”

    If you have not paid attention so far or simply did not get what this was all about, you’ll get it after I show why that statement is nonsensical.

    Here’s the fallacy in that claim: it completely abstracted the *monetary cost* of earning 1,000,000 WoH points vs. that of earning 1,000,000 HH points before the points can be redeemed! The short of it is that you “would get more redemptions from redeeming the 1 million WoH points than you would get redeeming the 1 million Honors points”, but.. at *** 3 times that monetary cost ***!!!

    That would be the classic definition of as a “Pyrrhic Victory!” 🙂

    Here’s the EASY math:

    To earn 1,000,000 WoH points, including those from the program’s co-brand CC bonus @ 4x, a Globalist, who earns 10.5x for hotel spend, would have to spend the following in hard cash:

    1,000,000 points / (10.5points/$) = $95,238

    To earn 1,000,000 HH points, including those from the program’s co-brand CC bonus @ 12x, a HH Diamond, who earns 32x for hotel spend, would have to spend the following in hard cash:

    1,000,000 points / (32.0points/$) = $31,250

    You want to do a 1:1 comparison of points, like 1M WoH vs. 1M HH points? Then you must also consider how much you would have to spend in hard cash to earn 1M points in each denomination! When you do that, you would spend

    $95K to get WoH points vs. just $31K to get HH points. See why the 1:1 comparison of points without considering the cost of the points is mindless? The comparison that would make sense is this one. If a Hilton Diamond and a WoH Globalist are each given $95K, how many points would they be able to purchase:

    WoH Globalist: $95,000 * 6.5WoH points/$ = ~1,00,000 WoH points

    Hilton Diamond: $95,000 * 32HH points/$ = ~3,000,000 HH points

    So, a 1:1 comparison or apples to apples between WoH and HH redemptions that have the same *monetary value* would have to be:

    1,000,000 WoH points vs. 3,000,000 HH points.

    Again see the factor of 3 that says:
    –1.5 cents per WoH points have exactly the same purchasing power or worth exactly the same as 0.5 cent per HH point.

    That is why
    …”Gary’s statement, given not only the fact that he was making a 1:1 comparison of each point, but also the general sense of how bloggers and others assign value to travel points, is based purely on a redemption or spend value – what do you get in exchange for each point you use”…
    is utterly bogus and nonsensical.

    Class dismissed!

  28. And given that DCS/L3 is repeatedly on record as saying that a point has no value until it is redeemed, everything that you read above is nothing more than his moving the goalposts so that he can never be wrong.

  29. @DCS/L3: “LOL.

    Citing me out of context changes nothing. You’ve been exposed…

    Checkmate!“

    Not only are you still projecting, your attempt to weasel out of your shifting arguments are pretty pathetic.

    Everything that you are arguing here does nothing more than contradict yourself – trying to inject the ease of earning points (which is not even a consistent or stable metric, since you have made assumptions on said earning that may or may not apply to any given situation) into a discussion of value effectively says that the value of the point is determined at the time it is earned, not at the time it is redeemed.

    Also, DCS/L3, even if your arguments here were actually logical and not contradictory, there is no prize for being right on the internet, so the only thing that your asinine “checkmate” comment does is further reinforce your narcissism. Grow up and get help.

  30. Anyway, addressing you has given you the “validation” that you so crave, even though it was to point out and debunk your nonsensical claims. You are now again on the ‘ignore list’, like at OMAAT.

    May @L3, who you psychopathologically persist in thinking is the same person as me, entertain you henceforth,

    Goodbye.

  31. To anyone following this “debate” with bated breath, let me further clarify these statements:
    _________
    So, a 1:1 comparison or apples to apples between WoH and HH redemptions that have the same *monetary value* would have to be:

    1,000,000 WoH points vs. 3,000,000 HH points.

    Again see the factor of 3 that says:
    –1.5 cents per WoH points have exactly the same purchasing power or worth exactly the same as 0.5 cent per HH point.
    __________________

    “Same purchasing power between 1.5cents per WoH point and 0.5cent per HH point” means that after spending $95K to earn 1,000,000 WoH points or 3,000,000 HH points, one achieves the same monetary value on redemption:

    1,000,000 WoH points * $0.015/WoH point = $15,000
    3,000,000 HH pointss * $0.005.HH point = $15,000

    See? No difference is cash value. Got it now?

    Q.E.D.

  32. Gary – see what happens when you let DCS post on your blog again? Instant derailment of non-Hilton topics back to Hilton 🙂 it was so much more pleasant for the last year…

  33. Boy, here he goes again, complaining that my comments are off-topic when he cannot find anything intelligent to say.

    Since you clearly missed it, this has been about the timeless issue of ‘value of points’ based on a statement by the forum host *in this blog post*. If you knew better, you’d stop trying to create a polemic where none exists and focus instead on learning something!

  34. @DCS/L3: “1,000,000 WoH points * $0.015/WoH point = $15,000
    3,000,000 HH pointss * $0.005.HH point = $15,000

    See? No difference is cash value. Got it now?

    Q.E.D.“

    No difference in cash value, yes, but a threefold difference in the number of points pretty well says, while telling Gary what he was saying was “demonstrably false,” that you actually agree with him.

    Glad you finally got to where everyone else is, DCS/L3.

  35. @DCS/L3: “You are now again on the ‘ignore list’, like at OMAAT.”

    You’ve been promising me that for two years and it’s never lasted, so I have no reason to believe that you’ll actually do me that favor.

    Oh, and yet again, stop projecting – the only person here who needs validation is you.

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