New Limited-Time Offer: 9 Reasons You Want The Hilton Honors Business Card

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The Hilton Honors American Express Business Card has a strong limited time up front offer. In correspondence with readers this has proven especially popular. It’s a really undervalued card in a lot of ways – great value for the price, and not only because of the bonus.

There are 9 reasons, I think, to consider getting this card – which you should consider now that American Express has launched a new up front bonus offer that’s among the best we’ve seen since it includes a rich statement credit.

  1. Initial bonus: The Hilton Honors American Express Business Card has a Limited Time Offer: Earn 130,000 Hilton Honors Bonus Points after you spend $3,000 in purchases on the Card in the first 3 months of Card Membership. Plus, you can earn up to $130 in Statement Credits on eligible purchases made on the Card at any of the Hilton family hotels in the first 12 months of Membership. Offer expires 7/6/2022.

  2. Strong return on spend at Hilton properties: the card will earn Hilton Honors Bonus Points for each dollar of eligible purchases on your Card: 12X at hotels and resorts in the Hilton portfolio, 6X at US gas stations, on US purchases for shipping, on wireless telephone services purchased directly from US service providers, on flights booked directly with airlines or with Amex Travel, on car rentals booked directly from select car rental companies, and at US restaurants, 3X on all other eligible purchases.

  3. Complimentary Hilton Gold status: which is great for avoiding those inferior rooms and gets complimentary breakfast, highly useful at resorts, it was a huge savings on my last beach vacation at Bora Bora Nui.


    Bora Bora Nui Breakfast Buffet Stretches An Entire Room

  4. Spend for Diamond status: Receive top tier Diamond status after $40,000 spend on the card in a calendar year. If you just wanted Diamond the pricier premium personal card comes with that, but you may be spending $40,000 on this card anyway because of the benefits for spending even more than that.

  5. Annual free weekend night: $15,000 spend in purchases in a calendar year earns a weekend night reward.

  6. Additional free weekend night from spend: You earn another weekend night after you spend $60,000 in purchases on your card in the same calendar year. And since $40,000 spend earns Diamond status, if you earn the second free night you also are a top tier elite.


    Conrad Bora Bora Nui

  7. Airport lounge access: The card lets you opt in for Priority Pass Select offering airport lounge access including 10 visits each year, which is amazing value on a $95 annual fee card (See Rates & Fees).

  8. Reportedly easier approvals. Over the past several months business credit card approvals have been tough, which is consistent with the experience reported by many readers. It’s understandable with all the uncertainty for small businesses during the pandemic and in this economy that banks would be cautious extending them new credit. However if reader reports about The Hilton Honors American Express Business Card are an indication that appears to be changing.

  9. Doesn’t add to Chase 5/24: American Express small business cards aren’t counted in your 5/24 total that Chase uses when considering whether to approve you for a card.


Conrad Koh Samui

Click here for rates and fees on The Hilton Honors American Express Business Card

About Gary Leff

Gary Leff is one of the foremost experts in the field of miles, points, and frequent business travel - a topic he has covered since 2002. Co-founder of frequent flyer community InsideFlyer.com, emcee of the Freddie Awards, and named one of the "World's Top Travel Experts" by Conde' Nast Traveler (2010-Present) Gary has been a guest on most major news media, profiled in several top print publications, and published broadly on the topic of consumer loyalty. More About Gary »

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Editorial note: any opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any card issuer. Comments made in response to this post are not provided or commissioned nor have they been reviewed, approved, or otherwise endorsed by any bank. It is not the responsibility of advertisers Citibank, Chase, American Express, Barclays, Capital One or any other advertiser to ensure that questions are answered, either. Terms and limitations apply to all offers.

Comments

  1. Free buffet breakfast is over in the US since July 1, even for Diamonds, its a credit that may cover a muffin and coffee. And these points are worth $0.004-0.0045 each at most, so it doesn’t really make sense to put high spending on this card compared to using others…

  2. @ Gary — Thanks for pointing this out. This is one of the few cards I can get without screwing up my 5/24 — 2 months to go :). I got the pop up on this card a few months ago, but today I was approved! As @LK says, the offer isn’t worth much, but better than nothing. This card will rarely, if ever, be used after the first $2,000 spend.

  3. Is anyone else getting the pop up but never even have had this card before? I get it on nearly every AMEX application. Any workarounds?

  4. I used it for the 15k/ free night feature. During the pandemic phase that award availability was good, the certs were quite valuable as they were good any night if the week.

  5. Points for the rich and famous. What does the average family who takes one international vacation every few years? NADA.

    When will a hospitality company, do something for the family on a budget? These points programs, are NOT for your average family. The incentives to get more “points”, are not for the faint of heart, hard working individuals, who don’t fit the “points” mentality.

    Further, “all inclusive”, is for the bottom line of the hotels, disguised as a benefit to the paying guests.

    NO HOTEL ON PLANET EARTH, INITIATES PROGRAMS TO BREAK EVEN, OR “LOSE MONEY”. Ask yourself, the real reason for hotels offering “all inclusive”? The only intelligent answer, is to pad the bottom line.

    Posted by a long time hospitality industry individual, who is genuinely concerned for the paying guests.

  6. This looks like a good place to post a comment to educate the masses…

    And these [Hilton] points are worth $0.004-0.0045 each at most, so it doesn’t really make sense to put high spending on this card compared to using others.

    — LK

    That comment is ignorant, as are nearly all comments, claims or assertions that pertain to the relative “worth” of hotel points currencies. What @LL stated there can be rephrased as follows without loss of its intent to demean…unnecessarily because they’ve imbibed too much kool-aid and are confuses. @LK, let me know if you change your mind and recant:

    And these [Hyatt] points are worth $0.012-$0.0135 each at most, so it doesn’t really make sense to put high spending on this card compared to using others.

    The reason those two statements convey the same meaning of dejection unnecessarily, believe it or not, is that all the major hotel loyalty points currencies are worth exactly the same. If you are happy getting $0.012-$0.0135/Hyatt point, you should be equally happy getting $0.004-$0.0045/Hilton point. And – get this – the only hotel points currency that was worth less than the rest (so make that “worthless”), was the now-defunct starpoint that self-anointed “travel gurus” ignorantly crowned “the single most valuable hotel points currency.” In fact, the starpoint was so worthless as a hotel points currency that it became more popular as a points currency to earn with the SPG AMEX and then transfer to airline miles, without ever setting foot in Starwood hotels, which, quite likely, contributed to the chain’s demise.

    BTW, anyone who’s imbibed too much kool-aid, including their own, would fail to see that there is a numerical factor of 3 between this offer and that for the Chase World of Hyatt visa, that makes the two offers and cards virtually identical. So, for once, @Gary Leff is right to promote a HH card!

    Recurrent factor of 3 in Chase WoH card vs. this AMEX HH card:
    _______________________________________________________

    ‘Bonus points earned: 60K vs. 180K
    Card earn rate at hotels: 4x vs 12x

    Chase WoH visa gets 2x
    at restaurants, on airline tickets purchased directly from the airline, local transit and commuting as well as fitness club and gym memberships

    vs.

    AMEX Surpass Biz getting 6x
    at U.S. gas stations
    on wireless telephone services purchases directly from U.S. service providers
    on U.S. purchases for shipping
    at U.S. restaurants
    on flights booked directly with airlines or with Amex Travel
    on car rentals booked directly from select car rental companies

    On everything else: 1x vs. 3x

    Lastly,
    Numericalvalues of points: 1.5cents/WoH point vs. 0.5cent/HH point

    Notice that the denominators are not just “point”, but ‘WoH point’ and ‘HH point’; and because 1 Hyatt point is not the same as 1 Hilton point, you cannot simply compare the magnitudes of the numerators (1.5cents vs. 0.5cent), and claim that the Hyatt point is worth more because that is an apples and oranges comparison that it is as stupid as claiming, a priori, that

    1.5cents/gallon gets you more gasoline that 0.5cent/liter.

    Look at the denominators!, they are different. We know that 1gallon = 3.8 liters, so

    1.5cents/gallon * 1gallon/3.8cents = 0.4cent/liter.

    which means that 0.5cent/liter gets you more gasoline than 1.5cents/gallon, although 1.5cents is 3x bigger than 0.5cent.

    Similarly, 1 WoH point = 3 HH points (see the factor of 3 above, which not accidental), so that

    1.5cents/WoH * 1WoH point/3 HH points = 0.5cent/HH point

    See? Just like 1.5cents/gallon = 0.4cent/liter (you get the same volume of gasoline with either)

    1.5cents/WoH point = 0.5cent/HH point

    The equality sign means that the two redemption values are, well, equal or the same, so that the WoH and HH points are worth exactly the same!

    You are not comparing 1.5cents/”point” vs 0.5cent/”point”, which everyone, without exception, does to claim that the WoH point or the Starpoint is/was the most valuable hotel points currency. But that is stupid because there is no such thing as a generic hotel “point”. Each program has its own points currency denomination that is not numerically equal 1:1 to any other, but is worth exactly the same as any other.

    If you are still confused, which you are, I will be happy to take you to kindergarten to brush up on your knowledge of math at that level, because the AMEX HH Surpass Biz card that you tried to denigrate gets you everything that you get with the Chase WoH visa.

    The reason to limit use of either card to only paying for stays at affiliated hotels where they earn more points that any other card, is that there are better cards for non-hotel spend that will earn you transferable points. The “opportunity cost” for using hotel cards for non-hotel spend is just too high (except when you are just 60K base points shy of attaining the HH Lifetime Diamond status, and every single bonus point earned with any HH AMEX card counts as base points!)

    G’day.

  7. Unless you’re systematically trying to accumulate points to earn a “free” stay at a specific Hilton property, you should NOT get this card. Hilton has devalued their program in a way that makes it almost uniquely less valuable. Sure, if you HAVE to stay at a Hilton, having status is a good thing. But anyone looking for a hotel loyalty program to extensively use should go with Hyatt as their first choice, and IHG as their back-up where Hyatt “doesn’t work.” I wouldn’t waste a credit card application on a Hilton card, even though I currently have several, which generally sit in my sock drawer.
    Gary, you would do your readers a favor by being more honest about Honors. I’m sure you are well aware of the current limited utility of their program — both from earning free nights and the amenities (or lack thereof) that you receive during your stays.

  8. @chopsticks — Your comment is as ignorant as the one I just tossed above in the garbage can where it belongs. Except for regurgitating, like pretty much everyone else, the same ol’ bogus claims from imbibing too much kool-aid that’s been served up for years by self-anointed “travel gurus”, you do not have a single shred of objective evidence to support anything that you advocated for or against in that comment. I bet you believe that a Hyatt point is “worth” more or is more “valuable” than any other hotel points currency. Well, that is garbage (see long semi-quantitative explanation above). I challenge you to provide your reasons for claiming that Hilton has “devalued their program in a way that makes it almost uniquely less valuable” (i.e., than any other program), when everyone seems to be just like Hilton (dynamic award pricing, anyone?), and I will toss each, one after the other, in the garbage can where it also belongs.

    What is closer to the reality and this applies to most who make fact-free claims like yours, is that you are totally clueless about how the game is played.

    I will be waiting for your enlightening retort with bated breath.

  9. A minor correction to make the liter vs. gallon of gas analogy above meaningful in the real world, without affecting anything else in the comment:

    The interpretation was backwards. Gas @0.5cent/l costs more @0.4cent/l so:
    0.4 cent/l =1.5 cents/gallon gets you more gasoline than 0.5cent/l for the same spend, and not less:

    $1 @ 0.4cent/l gets you: $1/$0.004/l = 250 l
    $1 @ 0.5cent/l gets you $1/$0.005/l = 200 l

    Another cautionary tale about just relying on the magnitudes of values!

  10. @DCS — Your personality is quite displeasing, but for the benefit of others, I will explain. In the past year, the cost of redeeming a typical Hilton hotel room has increased by at least 30% — regardless of the dollar cost of the room. A point is worth maybe .35 cents on average. It’s always possible to find something better some place, but you have to get very lucky — which is not what you want in a loyalty program. This compares quite unfavorably to IHG, and is ridiculous compared to Hyatt. If you’re the type of person who wants to spend 40,000 points to stay at a Hampton Inn, maybe Honors is still for you! At the same time, they have devalued the guest experience for elites at their better properties. Instead of getting a free breakfast, you get a small amount of credit which is inadequate to buy what they used to give you for free. You may not understand any of this, but I’m certain that most people reading this thread can understand it. FWIW, I am a Hilton Diamond, and my nights at Hilton properties are down about 80% in the past year, while I’ve doubled my IHG stays. Hilton was never competitive with Hyatt, which is obviously where I still try to stay when I can. But anyone who needs a “back up” program will likely do MUCH better at IHG than Hilton. I would note that IHG is even ENHANCING their program now, while Hilton is doing nothing but contining the devaluation.
    Bottomline, getting a new Hilton credit card now is foolish, unless you have a specific need for a specific Hilton stay.

  11. @Chopsticks – great of you to respond. As promised, I will dispatch your fact-free claims one by one.

    In the past year, the cost of redeeming a typical Hilton hotel room has increased by at least 30% — regardless of the dollar cost of the room. A point is worth maybe .35 cents on average. It’s always possible to find something better some place, but you have to get very lucky — which is not what you want in a loyalty program

    First, the “in past year” is a very poor time period by which to judge anything, especially in the hospitality industry that has been hit especially hard by the pandemic and continues to struggle to recover, more recently due to back-to-back flareups of SARS-CoV-2 infections by its Delta and then Omicron variants. That is, the light that many saw begin to see at end of the pandemic tunnel has turned out be a speeding train rather than an exit! Your reference point is totally flawed because, with many countries, especially in coveted Asian holiday cities and resorts, imposing quarantine on foreign visitors, the proportion of members of any program that has redeemed award stays since the start of the pandemic is infinitesimal compared to prior years.

    I could have stopped right there, but that’s not the only thing that is wrong with your “arguments.” They remain fact-free. You claimed that “the cost of redeeming a typical Hilton hotel room has increased by at least 30% — regardless of the dollar cost of the room.” On what basis did you come up with that 30% estimate, when hardly any award stays have been booked over the last couple of years? My last annual 4-week redemption at multiple Hilton hotels in N and SE Asia happened between 12 December 2019 and 12 January 2020. I did not redeem a single Hilton point since then until last week when I found and promptly booked a 5-night award stay at WA Maldives Ithaafushi for January 2023 that cost me 120K HH points/night with the 5th award night free – i.e., what that same exact redemption, which I did from 29 December 2019 to 3 January 2020, cost me. That is hardly a 30% increase that you claimed. Provide objective evidence or your claims have no value at all. Though Hilton adopted dynamic award pricing in 2017, most standard award costs have remained capped at their pre-dynamic pricing maxima +/- a few percents, with 95K points/night remaining the highest award rate, except for 120K-150K/night at WA Maldives and WA Los Cabos, its two most “aspirational” properties that did not even exist when Hilton still had an award chart.

    A [Hilton] point is worth maybe .35 cents on average.

    Prove it. If a Hilton point is “worth” that much now, then I bet you that all other hotel points currencies have also decreased proportionately, meaning that a Hyatt point is now “worth” about 1 cent each. The way to prove your point is to do dummy award bookings at hotels with comparable standard revenue room rates in the same locality of any city (e.g., Mid-town Manhattan, NY), and then make plots of redemption values in cpp vs. corresponding revenue room rates ($). If you do that for Hilton and Hyatt hotels, you will see a remarkable phenomenon: when Hilton redemption values decrease or increase, so do Hyatt’s while maintaining a ratio of 3! Fortunately, I did precisely such an “experiment” in which I chose Manhattan[1] and Tokyo[2] as venues, so that you do not have to, unless you wish to do it for different localities.

    Instead of getting a free breakfast, you get a small amount of credit which is inadequate to buy what they used to give you for free.

    Hilton is not making or saving any money by handing out vouchers instead of free breakfast in the US, as vouchers represent real money that they give to everyone (even encouraging members to claim extra room occupancy to double it), whether or not they care to have breakfast, that offsets other charges on the folio (for me it’s booze in lobby bars!). By contrast, free breakfast, which some members often skip thus decreasing the cost of providing it, represents a regular cost of doing business and is actually much lower than its perceived value to members. That is called reward leverage, a principle that underlies the now-irreversible move toward dynamic award pricing. I suspect that vouchers are being handed out because of the current tight labor market and that breakfast in the US will resume after the pandemic, especially with the reopening of exec lounges.

    Hilton was never competitive with Hyatt, which is obviously where I still try to stay when I can. But anyone who needs a “back up” program will likely do MUCH better at IHG than Hilton.

    Let me get this straight: Hilton Honors, the most innovate and most stable and trend-setting hotel loyalty program has never been competitive with World of Hyatt (previously known as Gold Passport), a program that does not give its elites the 4th or 5th award night free, which is the single most valuable perk in hotel loyalty; has the tiniest footprint that not only limits redemption options but also makes it tough to qualify for top elite status, which is among the most expensive out there and is the program’s only status that matters ; and offers garden-variety elite perks that self-anointed “travel gurus” have inexplicably elevated to the very essence of nirvana?! I say that you have imbibed too much kool-aid to think straight, which is evident in your placing even IHG ahead of Hilton Honors, when its recent programmatic “enhancements” seem to be designed to make it just like Hilton Honors!

    Please provide objective data to support your claims or this is the last I will say in this exchange. Speaking of objective data, please follow the links I provide in the comment that will take you to a startling demo of how redemption values of different points currencies, in this care Hilton’s and Hyatt’s, vary in synchrony to retain the ratio of 3 I demonstrated above — clear evidence of a points currency “peg” (look up “currency pegging”) that revolves around Hilton selling their point at 1 penny each (the unit of measure) and is designed to achieve some stability across the various points currencies. More on that interesting topic soon…

    G’day

    [1], [2] Links provided in next comment, which will be held in moderation y the forum host, so you might need to be patient and wait for their release.

  12. @Chopsticks — I just tried to address your response, but somehow the comment did not post! Maybe it is time I reboot my own long-dormant forum for which I just paid WordPress the annual fee, just in case censorship is being imposed to muzzle opposing views that cannot be refuted…

  13. Okay, no muzzling, so I will post my response in pieces to see what kept from posting.
    Preamble:

    @Chopsticks – great of you to respond. As promised, I will dispatch your fact-free claims one by one.

    In the past year, the cost of redeeming a typical Hilton hotel room has increased by at least 30% — regardless of the dollar cost of the room. A point is worth maybe .35 cents on average. It’s always possible to find something better some place, but you have to get very lucky — which is not what you want in a loyalty program

    First, the “in past year” is a very poor time period by which to judge anything, especially in the hospitality industry that has been hit especially hard by the pandemic and continues to struggle to recover, more recently due to back-to-back flareups of SARS-CoV-2 infections by its Delta and then Omicron variants. That is, the light that many saw begin to see at end of the pandemic tunnel has turned out be a speeding train rather than an exit! Your reference point is totally flawed because, with many countries, especially in coveted Asian holiday cities and resorts, imposing quarantine on foreign visitors, the proportion of members of any program that has redeemed award stays since the start of the pandemic is infinitesimal compared to prior years.

    I could have stopped right there, but that’s not the only thing that is wrong with your “arguments.” They remain fact-free. You claimed that “the cost of redeeming a typical Hilton hotel room has increased by at least 30% — regardless of the dollar cost of the room.” On what basis did you come up with that 30% estimate, when hardly any award stays have been booked over the last couple of years? My last annual 4-week redemption at multiple Hilton hotels in N and SE Asia happened between 12 December 2019 and 12 January 2020. I did not redeem a single Hilton point since then until last week when I found and promptly booked a 5-night award stay at WA Maldives Ithaafushi for January 2023 that cost me 120K HH points/night with the 5th award night free – i.e., what that same exact redemption, which I did from 29 December 2019 to 3 January 2020, cost me. That is hardly a 30% increase that you claimed. Provide objective evidence or your claims have no value at all. Though Hilton adopted dynamic award pricing in 2017, most standard award costs have remained capped at their pre-dynamic pricing maxima +/- a few percents, with 95K points/night remaining the highest award rate, except for 120K-150K/night at WA Maldives and WA Los Cabos, its two most “aspirational” properties that did not even exist when Hilton still had an award chart.

  14. In the past year, the cost of redeeming a typical Hilton hotel room has increased by at least 30% — regardless of the dollar cost of the room. A point is worth maybe .35 cents on average. It’s always possible to find something better some place, but you have to get very lucky — which is not what you want in a loyalty program

    First, the “in past year” is a very poor time period by which to judge anything, especially in the hospitality industry that has been hit especially hard by the pandemic and continues to struggle to recover, more recently due to back-to-back flareups of SARS-CoV-2 infections by its Delta and then Omicron variants. That is, the light that many saw begin to see at end of the pandemic tunnel has turned out be a speeding train rather than an exit! Your reference point is totally flawed because, with many countries, especially in coveted Asian holiday cities and resorts, imposing quarantine on foreign visitors, the proportion of members of any program that has redeemed award stays since the start of the pandemic is infinitesimal compared to prior years.

  15. The following two links lead to objective data that support my response to this exchange in the preceding comment:

    A [Hilton] point is worth maybe .35 cents on average.

    Prove it. If a Hilton point is “worth” that much now, then I bet you that all other hotel points currencies have also decreased proportionately, meaning that a Hyatt point is now “worth” about 1 cent each. The way to prove your point is to do dummy award bookings at hotels with comparable standard revenue room rates within the same location in any city (e.g., Mid-town Manhattan, NY), and then make plots of redemption values in cpp vs. corresponding revenue room rates ($). If you do that for Hilton and Hyatt hotels, you will see a remarkable phenomenon: when Hilton redemption values decrease or increase, so do Hyatt’s while maintaining a ratio of 3! Fortunately, I did precisely such an “experiment” in which I chose Manhattan[1] and Tokyo[2] as venues, so that you do not have to, unless you wish to do it for different localities.”

    [1] https://bit.ly/3r7w6O5
    That link provides an overlay plot of Hilton (left Y-axis) and Hyatt (right Y-axis) redemption values v in cents per each program’s point vs. corresponding revenue room rates (same X-axis for both) ranging between $100 and $400 in Manhattan. All the data were obtained in May of 2020 by doing award searches, noting corresponding revenue room rates, and then computing redemption values. The data are thus as real as can be, except that the redemption rate values are a bit low because they do not included taxes. However, the point is clear: mean Hilton and Hyatt redemption values for comparable revenue room rates in Manhattan are both relatively low at a ratio of 3, as the value of the Hyatt point quite likely ”pegged” to that of a Hilton point. Good award often require flexibility on when to redeem and persistence in searching!

    [2] https://bit.ly/3uboXhD
    Same as above but shown for Tokyo, also around May 2020. Therefore, it’s the same legend as above, except for noting that the mean redemption values for both Hilton and Hyatt increased, while maintaining a ratio of 3.

    Q.E.D

    Nothing beats objective data to make one’s point!

  16. Nothing else seems to post, except for one with links that is now held in moderation. Let’s see if that posts and then may I will try to repost the response, or I will simply publish it on my own forum, which I will reopen when I am through composing my opus magnum that will correct the plethora of misconceptions that have plagued travel blogosphere for years.

  17. Okay! All the comments that had disappeared with no feedback as to what was happening have reappeared, showing my multiple attempts to figure out what the offending item(s) could have been by posting the comments in parts. Now my complete response is there, with
    — on January 29, 2022 at 1:51 pm, and that
    — on January 29, 2022 at 2:04 pm,
    forming the continuous response and everything else being partial duplicates.

    G’day!

  18. @ DCS – your “analyses(?)” aside with Tokyo, on any given day in the US the point redemption for a Hampton vs a Hyatt Place or Springfield Suites is significantly inflated, @chopsticks is correct. Hilton routinely asks 30,000 – 50,000 points for a $125 room! And don’t even get me started on their higher-end properties where you need a wheelbarrow full of points to even get in the door, 100,000+ easy/nt for $400 rooms. I dread shopping Hilton anymore knowing I’ll have to book & reshop 5+ times over several months to get the points required down to something less ridiculous.

    Breakfast is pretty much the same now between Hilton & Marriott with use of “credits,” but Hyatt so far is still a real, free breakfast when that’s important.

    Hilton is a perfect representation of our economy’s 7% inflation rate so in that way it is at least authentic!

  19. Been Marriott platinum for years and now staying at a Hilton for 128 days. I started looking at their collection of hotels the other day around the world and I must say Hilton’s is so far behind the competition. Their hotels are garbage. The only place I would be happy redeeming my points for may be Aruba or Hawaiian Village. Other then those they are all trash. Worst resort collection of any hotel brand out there.

  20. @Pam — Please play with Hilton’s Points Explorer (search for the link) and look at the monthly calendars (not just at initial search results that show property names and the range of award costs like, 15K-102K per night). Make sure to reset all filters for every search!

    Just because you found a Hampton that required a lot points does not make it a rule. You were probably looking at “premium” award costs and did not realize it, as those are frequently Hilton awards that people find and then conclude that there has been a “devaluation.” Remember that unlike other programs, Hilton will always show awards available even when there are no standard awards or property has classified them all as “premium” to discourage members from redeeming reward stays. The “wheelbarrow” costs are also for “premium” awards, which only stupid people would redeem because redemption values of awards are usually a quarter of a penny or less.

    I can provide links actual data that show the clear difference between standard and premium awards. The latter change linearly with revenue rates for different types of rooms within each property then there is break where standard award costs start.

    Hilton breakfast has always been awful in the US and nothing short of a “royal feast” overseas, where I travel preferentially. So, I am not affected and enjoy using breakfast credits to cover the costs of my lobby bar booze…

    G’day.

  21. @Brad sez: The only place I would be happy redeeming my points for may be Aruba or Hawaiian Village

    Seriously?…Hawaiian Village is it for you?
    That is the only thing that one needs to know to advise you to get out and see the world!

    Rome is a great city, and you can stay at WA Rome Cavalieri, a great property in a great city, for “just” 80K Hilton points/night (about 27K Hyatt points/night).

    Have fun at HHV!

  22. My prediction was right on the money. Loyalty lobby is reporting that breakfast will return in the US at Hilton properties with exec lounges, which is precisely what I’d predicted in this space just up-thread:

    DCS says:
    January 29, 2022 at 1:51 pm

    Hilton is not making or saving any money by handing out vouchers instead of free breakfast in the US, as vouchers represent real money that they give to everyone (even encouraging members to claim extra room occupancy to double it), whether or not they care to have breakfast, that offsets other charges on the folio (for me it’s booze in lobby bars!). By contrast, free breakfast, which some members often skip thus decreasing the cost of providing it, represents a regular cost of doing business and is actually much lower than its perceived value to members. That is called reward leverage, a principle that underlies the now-irreversible move toward dynamic award pricing. I suspect that vouchers are being handed out because of the current tight labor market and that breakfast in the US will resume after the pandemic, especially with the reopening of exec lounges.

  23. 1. The 130,000 may be worth 1 or 2 nights at a hotel now, depending on where you are at. Some hotels will up the points during high season.
    3 Gold Does not get you much. That breakfast is $15 credit towards a $26 buffet that Holiday Inn Express does better. Those inferior rooms at Bora Bora happen all the time at other locations in the Cities where you are really going to use this….. REALITY not expectation.
    4 Spend $40,000 for Diamond Status…. First who puts that much on a card each year, unless it is for business…. And if you did would you really get the most bang at a hotel?
    6 Earn another free night after spending $60,000 REALITY here!
    7 Lounge access…. If you spend this much on a Hilton card you ALREADY have lounge access. WASTE

  24. The thing that bothers me most about Hilton points is the total inability to book premium rooms ever. You”’ see a $400 room for 50K points and a slightly nicer room, like $650 suite asking $400K points. Why bother booking the worst room in the hotel when you know you’re elite benefits count for absolutely nothing (ok like enough to cover the tip at a descent hotel breakfast).

    I never even look at Hilton. Hyatt is always first, although they went down an unfortunate path by devaluing points, removing award availability and changing which rooms count as premium suites.

    All that aside, let’s focus on the value of points. Most programs seem to be below 1.5c per point (Hilton, Marriott…substantially lower). In what universe do it make sense to put your spend on anything other than a cash back card or something like the CSR which gets you a guaranteed rate of 1.5c on their travel portal and can be transferred.

    Can someone explain why anyone would push these co-branded cards? Seriously, of the “9 things” listed, I’d say 9 of them are hardly reasons to get the card. TOMRI should add:

    2. Great, you can accumulate worthless points at properties that don’t give you much for being elite.

    8 & 9. Who cares considering there’s no real reason to get the card anyway

  25. @DCS your poor reasoning is only exceeded by your verbosity

    Award availability is by far the worse at Hilton because they lead in restricting the definition of standard awards. Marriott isn’t far behind . Hyatt has solid availabilty for all but the few that played games (and the savvy could outflank those restrictions)0

  26. Interesting comments about this topic. I have been an IHG fan for a very long time and have gotten great value from the program for many years. I have tried Hyatt, but their selection is so poor in the places I go to that I was not able to use my WOH free night multiple times, so I cancelled the card. I started getting HH cards about 5 years ago and have been very happy with my experience and the value that I get from them.

    With the WOH I was able to stay at the Park Hyatt Vendome and the Park Hyatt Vienna, two great hotels, but that has been the extent of it for me. I’ve stayed countless times at IHG and Hilton hotels and continue to do so. The number of Hyatts available is pathetic and not worth my time.
    Hilton Honors has become my favored program now, beating out IHG.
    Full disclosure: I like to stay at nice hotels. While WOH has some nice ones, but not as many as IHG and HH that I can take advantage of.

    While I don’t like the arrogant tone of his posts, I agree with the points made by DCS.

  27. “The thing that bothers me most about Hilton points is the total inability to book premium rooms ever. You”’ see a $400 room for 50K points and a slightly nicer room, like $650 suite asking $400K points. ”
    This is applicable to all the hotel programs.

    How I get around this:
    #1: On different occasions, at both IHG and Hilton I would book a standard room with points, due to my status (from credit card) I would get upgraded to the next level room. Once I checked in I would call and ask if they could give me an upgrade to a suite and I have been upgraded to a suite on several occasions at no cost to me! All I did was ask for it.

    #2 At other times I will contact the hotel and ask them how much it will cost for me to pay to upgrade to the suite from the standard room that I booked using points. The upgrade cost so far has always been much less than the cost difference between the cash price for a lesser room and the cash price for the room I really wanted. For example from a recent booking: Standard room is $150 (before taxes and fees) and the executive suite with club access was $500 (before taxes and fees). I got the standard room using free a night certificate and paid $240 total to get the executive suite with club lounge access! I saved hundreds of dollars a night and got what I wanted.

  28. Cahn’t make this stuff up!

    Award availability is by far the worse at Hilton because they lead in restricting the definition of standard awards. Marriott isn’t far behind . Hyatt has solid availabilty for all but the few that played games (and the savvy could outflank those restrictions)0

    That’s just nonsense. If you are referring to award availability at Hilton’s uber-aspirational properties, then you might have a point, except that it is a nonsensical point because the same is true of any other major program’s uber-aspirational awards.

    Don’t take my word for it: just play with Hilton’s points explorer utility that allows one to search for standard awards in whole countries at once and then come back tell me where you have a hard time finding standard Hilton awards. You won’t find any at WA Maldives, WA Los Cabos, Conrad Bora Bora and at a few other very high-end properties, but that is to be expected because such awards do not just wait around to be booked. They are snatched up like hot cakes as soon as they are released…just like in any program.

    @DCS your poor reasoning is only exceeded by your verbosity

    And your poor reasoning and your stupidity are one and the same..

    G’day.

  29. Given the Biden economic bust that’s now here I don’t think people should be getting more credit cards. Stock up on food before the food riots hit.

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