[HUGE New Offer] 9 Reasons You Want The Hilton Honors Business Card

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The Hilton Honors American Express Business Card has a strong up front offer. In correspondence with readers this has proven especially popular. It’s a really undervalued card in a lot of ways – great value for the price, and not only because of the bonus. But the big takeaway right now is the free night on top of the bonus points you can earn from the card’s initial bonus offer.

There are 9 reasons, I think, to consider getting this card – which you should consider now that American Express has launched a new up front bonus offer that’s among the best we’ve seen since it includes a rich statement credit.

  1. Initial bonus: The Hilton Honors American Express Business Card has a Limited Time Offer: Earn 130,000 Hilton Honors Bonus Points after you spend $5,000 in purchases on the Hilton Honors Business Card in the first 3 Months of Card Membership. Plus you can earn a Free Night Reward after you spend $10,000 in purchases on the Hilton Honors Business Card in the first 6 months of Card Membership. Offer ends 12/21/22.

  2. Strong return on spend at Hilton properties: the card will earn Hilton Honors Bonus Points for each dollar of eligible purchases on your Card: 12X at hotels and resorts in the Hilton portfolio, 6X at US gas stations, on US purchases for shipping, on wireless telephone services purchased directly from US service providers, on flights booked directly with airlines or with Amex Travel, on car rentals booked directly from select car rental companies, and at US restaurants, 3X on all other eligible purchases.

  3. Complimentary Hilton Gold status: which is great for avoiding those inferior rooms and gets complimentary breakfast, highly useful at resorts, it was a huge savings on my last beach vacation at Bora Bora Nui.


    Bora Bora Nui Breakfast Buffet Stretches An Entire Room

  4. Spend for Diamond status: Receive top tier Diamond status after $40,000 spend on the card in a calendar year. If you just wanted Diamond the pricier premium personal card comes with that, but you may be spending $40,000 on this card anyway because of the benefits for spending even more than that.

  5. Annual free weekend night: You’ll earn a Free Night Reward from Hilton Honors after you spend $15,000 in purchases on your Card in a calendar year.

  6. Additional free weekend night from spend: You earn another Free Night Reward from Hilton Honors after you spend an additional $45,000 in purchases on your Card in the same calendar year. And since $40,000 spend earns Diamond status, if you earn the second free night you also are a top tier elite.


    Conrad Bora Bora Nui

  7. Airport lounge access: The card lets you opt in for Priority Pass Select offering airport lounge access including 10 visits each year, which is amazing value on a $95 annual fee card (See Rates & Fees).

  8. Reportedly easier approvals. Over the past several months business credit card approvals have been tough, which is consistent with the experience reported by many readers. It’s understandable with all the uncertainty for small businesses during the pandemic and in this economy that banks would be cautious extending them new credit. However if reader reports about The Hilton Honors American Express Business Card are an indication that appears to be changing.

  9. Doesn’t add to Chase 5/24: American Express small business cards aren’t counted in your 5/24 total that Chase uses when considering whether to approve you for a card.


Conrad Koh Samui

Click here for rates and fees on The Hilton Honors American Express Business Card

About Gary Leff

Gary Leff is one of the foremost experts in the field of miles, points, and frequent business travel - a topic he has covered since 2002. Co-founder of frequent flyer community InsideFlyer.com, emcee of the Freddie Awards, and named one of the "World's Top Travel Experts" by Conde' Nast Traveler (2010-Present) Gary has been a guest on most major news media, profiled in several top print publications, and published broadly on the topic of consumer loyalty. More About Gary »

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Editorial note: any opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any card issuer. Comments made in response to this post are not provided or commissioned nor have they been reviewed, approved, or otherwise endorsed by any bank. It is not the responsibility of advertisers Citibank, Chase, American Express, Barclays, Capital One or any other advertiser to ensure that questions are answered, either. Terms and limitations apply to all offers.

Comments

  1. Platy.

    How many miles will that buy on Singapore Airlines? “Duped”!”

    The number of miles is irrelevant. I’m quoting you the money I spent on groceries in my local supermarket to earn points and the cash value I obtained when I redeemed those points.

    I’m spending money on groceries (money I’d be spending anyway), thereby earning the points and then redeeming the points.

    FWIW I didn’t even use Singapore Airlines miles to make the booking.

    My wife and I are travelling business class return to Europe from Australia (the equivalent cash value is over USD17,500) next week on points (no fuel surcharges to worry about on this occasion) we have earned buying groceries over a two-year period.

    We have no allegiance to Singapore Airlines whatsoever!

    I have never once bought an airfare from Singapore Airlines!

    And that’s just the front end of an extensive list of cash value benefit from engagement of various hotel and airline loyalty programs for our RTW trip….;).

    “So, you are held hostage, with one airline.”

    Not at all, in fact, I’ve never once bought an airfare from Singapore Airlines! Similarly, I am a loyalty program member of various other loyalty programs of airlines I don’t patronise as a paying customer.

    I am regularly leveraging opportunities from about 4 hotel loyalty programs and 6-10 airline loyalty programs.

    “I travel Internationally extensively. i.e. In August, and early September, I spent 12 days in Chianti Tuscany, Italy, and 6 days in Yerevan, Armenia.”

    Great – but utterly irrelevant.

    “As I said early on, the ONLY benefactors, are those that offer points (69% redeemed), and frequent travelers, who must be diligent, and monitor every reservation, and grocery shopping.”

    And as I said, I don’t earn / acquire the vast majority of my posts by being “loyal” to any hotel or airline loyalty program. Yes, it takes some effort to get the high end returns.

    Why is a USD16,500 cash value scoop from my about USD15,000 worth grocery shopping (over a two-year period) anything other than an excellent result?!

    “You profess your math skills, if you, or anyone collecting points, deduct 31%, +/-, that are not used, tell me, exactly what your NET/NET equates to? And/or, take the gross points in all programs, and deduct 31%. Now, tell me, “who wins”? Figures lie, and liars figure!”

    I don’t waste 31% of my points. She people do, but I don’t. In any case, you are quoting an average figure.

    My Singapore Airlines KrisFlyer account is currently at zero points having just redeemed two first class flights from SIN to LHR for next year. Those points came from a credit card

    “Sure sounds like trouble in paradise”

    Arguably, the greatest problem with hotels and airlines these days are the huge variations in what they charge for their product due to their insane yield management practices.

    My only loyalty is to the math!

    ‘Nuff said.

    Enjoy your travels and be safe, fella!

    Reply

    Platy.

    You prove my point (no pun intended), everytime you write. 700 Singapore Airlines points, on an airline you haven’t and will never use. How much cash can you get tomorrow for this tomorrow?

    I just realized, thanks to your verbiage, this is “all about you”.

    You don’t care about percentages, because it doesn’t fit your narrative. Fully understood. Points and all your programs you enjoy, IS based on EVERYONE in the programs, not just YOU. And YOU ignore documented FACTS!

    With your high %, it’s a few like you, who keeps that at 69%. Which means, there are many, who are in the 15-20% and a few lower. ALL the programs you are in, would you believe they are for everyone? As such, worldwide, which includes down under, equal 69%. And THAT is the ONLY important FACT.

    No one on planet earth, know your %, and they don’t care. You are a drop of water in the ocean.

    Our tete a tete, is regarding the programs, not YOU. I have been crunching numbers, in the hospitality industry for years, vs 0 for you. I intimately FULLY UNDERSTAND, how it’s done. YOU CLEARLY DO NOT!

    I am of the belief, that all guests receive the same service, as they did when I entered the industry. Everything was transparent. I guarantee you, all your precious loyalty and points programs, are factored in, the rates you pay. Since you are totally ignorant, how hotels determine rates, you clearly don’t “get it”!

    I highly recommend, you take, a hotel accounting class, 101.

    I am wondering, how many other Singapore Airlines type points you have accumulated, that are on paper and NEVER will be redeemed. You are a millionaire in paper!

    I read recently, where ladies of the night, are giving points. To that end, Johns don’t mind, getting screwed. .

    Continued success with your numerous programs. I am anxious to hear, your response to how, when and how much, your 700 Singapore Airlines points will be redeemable for?

    I don’t want to continue our exchange. You know everything, and are not teachable. Believe what you wish.

    Notwithstanding, we are not being considerate, to Gary’s blog.

    Happy Trails.

    Ciao

  2. “My wife and I are travelling business class return to Europe from Australia (the equivalent cash value is over USD17,500) next week on points (no fuel surcharges to worry about on this occasion) we have earned buying groceries over a two-year period.”.

    Why is my trip to Italy and Armenia not important, but your trip is?

    This proves this is ALL ABOUT YOU!

    “We have no allegiance to Singapore Airlines”.

    No one said you were. It’s not allegiance, it’s about points earned on an airline, that you must use, to redeem them.

    Everything is about YOU!

    Keep on shopping .

  3. “700 Singapore Airlines points, on an airline you haven’t and will never use.”
    I wrote 700 bucks of redeemed value in business class airfare, not 700 Singapore Airlines points (which are actually called miles and not points, by the way).
    “How much cash can you get tomorrow for this tomorrow?”
    I already quoted the equivalent cash value of the redemption (16,500 dollars).
    “I just realized, thanks to your verbiage, this is “all about you”.”
    I am quoting real life examples, which prove you are wrong in claiming that loyalty programs are futile and those that engage are stupid.
    “You don’t care about percentages, because it doesn’t fit your narrative.”
    Actually, the opposite. I have quoted you percentage net returns, which savvy members can glean from engaging in various loyalty programs.
    The math is fundamental and exists beyond any personal narrative, as already cited in my posts above.
    “Points and all your programs you enjoy, IS based on EVERYONE in the programs, not just YOU. And YOU ignore documented FACTS!”
    Exactly what “facts” have been denied, Robert?
    If you read my posts, I clearly state that there are loyalty members who get nothing, others who get something back, but of low value, and some who do very well.
    “With your high %, it’s a few like you, who keeps that at 69%. Which means, there are many, who are in the 15-20% and a few lower.”
    Robert, you appear to confuse percentage net return and the percentage of miles / points, which go unused.
    You appear to ignore the fact that any loyalty member has the opportunity to access excellent value from a loyalty program.
    Most do not. How is that possibly the “fault” of those who do find great value?!
    “ALL the programs you are in, would you believe they are for everyone?”
    If by “everyone” you mean the tens and hundreds of millions of members which various loyalty programs claim.
    “As such, worldwide, which includes down under, equal 69%. And THAT is the ONLY important FACT.”
    The publicly available data I have personally seen for some loyalty programs indicate that the lessor proportion are “active” (earned or redeemed points in the last 24 months). They majority of members have signed up only to disengage for whatever reason. It’s up to the respective loyalty program to address that.
    “No one on planet earth, know your %, and they don’t care. You are a drop of water in the ocean.”
    If they learned the math, they would have the option to improve the value they derive from their engagement in a loyalty program. Their choice.
    That math exists whether they stumble upon it for themselves or read an enlightened article on a travel blog or learn from somebody savvy.
    The math exists regardless of your evidently derisory attitude.
    “Our tete a tete, is regarding the programs, not YOU. I have been crunching numbers, in the hospitality industry for years, vs 0 for you. I intimately FULLY UNDERSTAND, how it’s done. YOU CLEARLY DO NOT!”
    There is no evidence in your posts of such claimed numeracy.
    “I am of the belief, that all guests receive the same service, as they did when I entered the industry. Everything was transparent. I guarantee you, all your precious loyalty and points programs, are factored in, the rates you pay. Since you are totally ignorant, how hotels determine rates, you clearly don’t “get it”!”
    My analysis is from the perspective of a loyalty program member. How hotels set their rates is of no consequence. To the customer they are a given. They may determine whether the customer purchases a room at that hotel or not.
    “I highly recommend, you take, a hotel accounting class, 101.”
    I suggest you learn how to calculate the product of two variables together.
    “I am wondering, how many other Singapore Airlines type points you have accumulated, that are on paper and NEVER will be redeemed. You are a millionaire in paper!”
    Not at all, Robert. I have zero Singapore Airlines miles in my account. I used them all up to the last mile knowing exactly how many miles I would need for the first-class redemption that I wanted from SIN-LHR.
    My wife has exactly the number of miles in her account required for out next intended trip.
    “I read recently, where ladies of the night, are giving points. To that end, Johns don’t mind, getting screwed.”
    Love it!
    “ I am anxious to hear, your response to how, when and how much, your 700 Singapore Airlines points will be redeemable for?”
    It was 700 bucks worth of redemption not 700 miles (points).
    “I don’t want to continue our exchange. You know everything, and are not teachable. Believe what you wish.”
    Actually, I have told you twice that I would be very interested to read or hear about the stories of your career.
    Gotta go pack – please do travel safe – tell us about your incredible career sometime…write the book! I’ll buy the first copy…

  4. My analysis is from the perspective of a loyalty program member. How hotels set their rates is of no consequence. Oh contrare. This proves how little you KNOW.

    i.e. If a hotel charges $100 or $ 135 a night, but offer the same services to “Loyalty program members”, you don’t have a clue, WHY?
    Answer: Because, you don’t know the real price of the room.

    AHHH, THE $ 35.00 DIFFERENCE IN MY EXAMPLE, GOES TO COVER LOYALTY PROGRAM MEMBERS FREEBIES, NOTWITHSTANDING, “PROFITS TO THE ENTITYS, BOTTOM LINE”.

    (NOTE:. THIS IS AN “EXAMPLE”. DON’T USE YOUR EXEMPLARY MATH SKILLS TO DEBATE IT.) it is simply an explanation, on how hotels, and everyone else, is able to give anything away, FREE.

    HINT:. THEY PAD THE PRICE!

    END RESULTS? YOU ARE PAYING FOR BEING A PRECIOUS LOYALTY PROGRAM MEMBER. CONGRATULATIONS. THAT’S WHY THEY LOVE YOU. I AM TRULY JEALOUS. .

    You write (regarding loyalty program members taking advantage of what’s available to them), “Most do not.”. YOU PROVE ME RIGHT EVERYTIME! WHICH BRINGS ME BACK TO 69%, FOR “EVERYONE” IN POINTS AND LOYALTY PROGRAM MEMBERS.

    WOULD YOU BELIEVE, EVEN A BLIND CHICKEN, WILL OCCASIONALLY FIND A PIECE OF CORN?

    Regarding my industry experience, is not important to anyone but me. I spoke about it, one time, to provide the perspective of a seasoned Hotel and Hospitality executive and now, CEO of “my” company.

    You know what I have been doing most of my life. What type of work have you been involved with? I am dying to find out.

    Safe travels to you and your wife.

    Ciao

  5. @ Robert

    “i.e. If a hotel charges $100 or $ 135 a night, but offer the same services to “Loyalty program members”, you don’t have a clue, WHY?
    Answer: Because, you don’t know the real price of the room”

    Unfortunately, Robert, the “real price of the room” from the customer perspective is the price the customer pays for that room, regardless of whatever profit margins and price gouging may underpin that market rate.

    Contrary to your ranting assertions, I’m actually not stupid. I know that the cost and profit of the loyalty program itself is factored into whatever price the customer pays, whether they redeem any points or not. Everybody is paying for the loyalty program – points / miles are not free!

    But since you retired they invented a useful tool called the Internet.

    Any customer can research the cost of a hotel in their intended destination. They can choose a mainstream hotel chain (Marriott, Hilton, IHG, Hyatt etc) or not. They will usually find a cheaper and better value hotel nearby and disregard the mainstream loyalty programs and book on a consolidator website and scoop a 10% loyalty return or a batch of points for a chosen airline frequent flyer program.

    For example, you can stay at the Al Ponte Antico in Venice and enjoy a grand canal side suite in a small family run hotel for 5 to 10 TIMES less nightly rate than a suite in The Gritti Palace, etc.

    It is unfortunate for the customer that hotel operators now use yield management models which produce huge price variations in the market cost. Looking at hotels in Frankfurt Airport later in the week. When I checked the market rates (walkable Hilton / Marriott) 6 weeks ago they were at USD500 per night. Two days ago they were 40% less at USD300. And now three days out the price is creeping up again.

    Airlines are engaged in (arguably unconscionable) price gouging per their yield management approach. Qantas is currently charging USD15,000 for a business class return between Australia and the USA, 3 times greater than a more typical USD5000. They also hike their prices a day or two before the date travel.

    The interesting aspect is that these huge price variations are much greater than any component factored in to cover loyalty revenues.

    FWIW I can estimate the wholesale (“at cost”) underlying cost by checking out the base (cash equivalent) value of miles / points in combination of the standard award price.

    “AHHH, THE $ 35.00 DIFFERENCE IN MY EXAMPLE, GOES TO COVER LOYALTY PROGRAM MEMBERS FREEBIES, NOTWITHSTANDING, “PROFITS TO THE ENTITYS, BOTTOM LINE”.

    Well let’s take your example, Robert. Is it worth paying $135 with the benefits rather than $100 without the benefits. Would you pay a premium of 35%, right? In some cases the answer will be no and in some cases the answer will be yes. Some savvy folk are getting a return of 300% on their dollar spend, TEN TIMES the premium paid in your example – in such a hypothetical example, the member would have paid a premium of USD35 to enjoy a benefit worth USD300 compared with a nightly rate without the loyalty premium.

    ” it is simply an explanation, on how hotels, and everyone else, is able to give anything away, FREE.
    HINT:. THEY PAD THE PRICE!”

    Sure – every customer is paying for the loyalty program – the point is that, generally speaking, the value derived from being a member is not equally distributed. Per my earlier posts – some members get nothing, some little and others a lot of value.

    “END RESULTS? YOU ARE PAYING FOR BEING A PRECIOUS LOYALTY PROGRAM MEMBER. CONGRATULATIONS. THAT’S WHY THEY LOVE YOU. I AM TRULY JEALOUS.”

    Switched on loyalty members know that part of the price paid goes to the loyalty program revenue. Many members probably have never stopped to think about such matters. Some have their travel costs paid for by their employer and will perceive their points as “free”.

    “You write (regarding loyalty program members taking advantage of what’s available to them), “Most do not.”. YOU PROVE ME RIGHT EVERYTIME! WHICH BRINGS ME BACK TO 69%, FOR “EVERYONE” IN POINTS AND LOYALTY PROGRAM MEMBERS.”

    You are basing your conclusion on the average case, Robert. With your extensive industry experience, perhaps you can reveal the actual frequency distribution of realised values for individual members. The modal value may well be zero. The spread of values would be fascinating.

    “WOULD YOU BELIEVE, EVEN A BLIND CHICKEN, WILL OCCASIONALLY FIND A PIECE OF CORN?”

    Some loyalty members may blunder into redemptions of high value. Most likely, the readers of this blog are smart enough to engage with some foresight.

    They also know that they can be at the winning end by being the smart chicken that counts the pieces of corn!

    Many airline loyalty programs obviously have extended their reach into any manner of day-to-day opportunities to earn points without ever sitting on a plane or staying in a hotel – promos for credit cards, wine, SIM cards, fuel, all sorts of retail suppliers, etc. For the loyalty member that’s where the math kicks in…;)

    Luckily, we get to share the know-how and fruits of such with others (we share our points with family and friends).

    “Regarding my industry experience, is not important to anyone but me.”

    No worries – it sometimes seems such a shame to lose the value of decades of experience and wisdom.

    “You know what I have been doing most of my life. What type of work have you been involved with? I am dying to find out.”

    Consultant to multi-national corporates for over 25 years on the back of multiple research degrees in bio-sciences. More recently preparing financial feasibility study reports on engineering / mining mega-projects.

    “Safe travels to you and your wife.”

    Thanks – and to your good self.

    Off to book some hotels!!!

  6. BLAH, BLAH BLAH.

    SOOO many words, without any substance. You need to find a ghost writer, and print your novels.

    You wrote: “No worries – it sometimes seems such a shame to lose the value of decades of experience and wisdom.”

    Response. You missed something I wrote.

    I am putting together, my own hospitality company, that will include a minimum of 15, to maximum 22 properties, with an average, of 650 rooms. And, it will change the current mentality, of how the hotel industry operates and sets pricing. It won’t be for you. There will not be a Loyalty program. All your food, bought from the grocery store, or your Singapore Airlines 700 CASH, won’t be accepted.

    You already probably presume, I was not surprised at all, to learn, how you earn your living. Now, everything makes perfect sense.

    This will be my last response to you. I don’t have another minute, to waste on you.

    Good luck! Happy Loyalty and points programs.

    Goodbye.

  7. @ Robert

    “I am putting together, my own hospitality company…there will not be a Loyalty program…”

    Well, I wish you the best of luck with that, Robert.

    Once you have even one property operational be sure to come back and tell us all about it…;)

    (Hint – if you go about your business exhibiting the personally directed hatred and angst perfusing your posts above, you will risk alienating any potential customers).

    IMO any sophisticated investor reading your posts above would likely conclude that you are not personally backable.

    Back to your Drams, mate.

    Please do look after yourself.

  8. Hilton Honors alert. Their points program totally screwed up for certain of their hotels. Look at London for example .Biltmore. Mayfair. A few properties listed for all of ’23 nights at close to or over 300,000 points per night. Many listing even higher points per night even with dynamic pricing. . Totally out of whack with their cash rates for those same nights for same rooms . Totally absurd.. Property disclaims any part in setting their own points rates and agrees it is wrong. Corporate people at Honors paralyzed in acknowledging error and unable to fix the underlying errors. We travelers seriously hurt. Stay away. If not an error just incredible greed and distain for their card holder customers.

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