Earn More Than A 20% Rebate At Hyatt Restaurants Through December 20

Hyatt is offering triple points on spending at their hotel restaurants when you are not staying as a guest through December 20, 2022. You can earn points on dine-in, delivery and takeout as long as the charge is made by hotels set up to award points, and you provide them with your Hyatt account number. No registration is needed.

  • Naturally, all-inclusive hotel brands are excluded, and partners like MGM Resorts, Small Luxury Hotels, and Lindblad Expeditions are excluded.

  • Members may earn a maximum of 100,000 Bonus Points per transaction under this offer, which means you can top out at $10,000 spend.

  • If you redeem points against the charges, or pay with gift cards, the charges aren’t eligible.


Chef from the Park Hyatt Vienna

Normally you can earn 5 points per dollar dining at Hyatt restaurants, whether you’re a guest or not. Under this promo you earn triple points, or 15 points per dollar. And top tier elites receive their 30% bonus on the standard 5 points per dollar, so in total they earn 16.5 points.

I view 15 points per dollar as a 21% rebate (each Hyatt point worth 1.4 cents apiece). That makes it well worth picking a Hyatt restaurant that you enjoy, and makes it worth shifting your choice of venue for a business meal (the larger the group the better!) especially lucrative.

There are a couple of things to consider.

  1. It’s more lucrative to dine under this offer than to credit a meal to your folio when staying as a guest! They’re currently offering double points on stays of two or more nights but triple points are better. If you’re a hotel guest, consider crediting your meals to a spouse’s or travel partner’s account (and save receipts to make sure the points post).

  2. Some Hyatts don’t award points on alcohol even though they should. Local rules in some jurisdictions don’t allow incentives for alcohol spend, so hotels can opt out of awarding points for compliance with these rules. However Hyatt doesn’t police the reasons hotels opt out, so you may be surprised when the wine accompanying your meal doesn’t earn points.

I’d note that some Hyatt restaurants are quite good! Before I moved away from Washington, DC the Blue Duck Tavern at the Park Hyatt Washington was a perennial favorite (I earned points for a non-stay meal there a decade ago when the option was first launched) and I had a meal there while I was in town last week. If only I’d waited! And they do award points on alcohol spend.

Meanwhile I don’t know that I’ve ever eaten better steak than at the New York Grill at the Park Hyatt Tokyo. Japan is re-opening! Sadly the Grand Hyatt Singapore, home to Straits Kitchen, will be closed throughout much of this offer.


Park Hyatt Tokyo New York Grill Open Kitchen

As a Globalist earning 16.5 points per dollar spent I’d be generating more than a 23% rebate. That’s hard to beat, except perhaps with restaurant.com gift certificates purchased at a deep discount. And those don’t let you earn points on reimbursable meals, instead they’d save your employer money.

About Gary Leff

Gary Leff is one of the foremost experts in the field of miles, points, and frequent business travel - a topic he has covered since 2002. Co-founder of frequent flyer community InsideFlyer.com, emcee of the Freddie Awards, and named one of the "World's Top Travel Experts" by Conde' Nast Traveler (2010-Present) Gary has been a guest on most major news media, profiled in several top print publications, and published broadly on the topic of consumer loyalty. More About Gary »

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Comments

  1. I view 15 points per dollar as a 21% rebate (each Hyatt point worth 1.4 cents apiece).

    Your valuation of the Hyatt point is low. The correct value is 1.5 cents/WoH point, so that the “rebate” or “return on the dollar” or “RoD” on an earn rate of 15x is a bit higher:

    RoD = 1.5 cents/WoH point * 15 WoH points/$ = 22.5%

    G’day.

  2. @DCS The idea that you can tell someone what value they should ascribe to a miles and points currency is both laughable and obnoxious. Everybody’s “mileage will vary”. By all means, suggest what *you* think a point or mile is worth, but saying “Your valuation of the Hyatt point is low” before going on to say that “The correct value is 1.5 cents/WoH point” is staggeringly arrogant.

  3. @DCS The idea that you can tell someone what value they should ascribe to a miles and points currency is both laughable and obnoxious. Everybody’s “mileage will vary”. By all means, suggest what *you* think a point or mile is worth, but saying “Your valuation of the Hyatt point is low” before going on to say that “The correct value is 1.5 cents/WoH point” is staggeringly arrogant.

    @Ziggy – you are wrong and confused like everyone else. I have not modeled airline miles or bank points and cannot [yet] make any claims about those, but I have extensively modeled hotel loyalty points currencies, and shown that highly accurate values all the major hotel loyalty points currencies can be calculated analytically. The math is so solid it qualifies exact science. I wrote it up over at OMAAT the other day. Please follow the link I will provide in the next post below (when it is released from moderation) to see for yourself and call me to apologize for the “laughable and obnoxious…staggeringly arrogant” characterization.

    What confuses you in believing that values of points currencies are “Everybody’s “mileage will vary”” is that, like everyone else, you lump “face” or “nominal” values of points currencies, which are fixed and objective and can be calculated analytically, and “redemption” values of points currencies, which do not exist until points have been redeemed according to individual preferences and are thus subjective and variable, i.e., YMMV.

    Please follow below the link to what is perhaps one of the most enlightening comments in the history of travel blogosphere. It will blow you away if you know even kindergarten-level math.

  4. EXTRA! EXTRA! READ ALL ABOUT IT !!!
    Mathematical proof that all hotel points currencies are worth exactly the same !!!

    Please go to the link:

    https://bit.ly/3S4dysM

    Scroll down to comment labeled…

    DCS Diamond
    September 11, 2022, 5:50 pm

    … (date time of comment important ) and see the cleaned up comment as the third response> under the fold.

    Be blown away!

  5. @DCS I can’t find it under that link, but I saw your comment the other day on Ben’s site where you literally define the points as being equal the same as part of your ‘mathematical proof’

  6. @Gary — What I linked to is that comment on Ben’s site that you saw, and glad you saw it. Folks just need to scroll down to my comment (DCS) at 5:50pm, 3rd response under the fold for the cleaned up comment, as I initially struggled with an unterminated HTML.

    BTW, it’s the math that proved that all hotel points currencies, whose “face” or “nominal” values can be calculated analytically from only base earn rates, are worth exactly the same. The conclusion is inescapable.

  7. @DCS – you ‘assume’ all hotel chains offer equivalent rebate value and work backwards to a value per point, at least from the comment I saw earlier.

  8. @Gary — I see. That is how science is done. The assumption was based on a VERY simple concept that virtually everyone, you included, has a hard time grasping, which is that one cannot compare 1.5 cents/Hyatt point vs. 0.5 cent/Hilton point and decide that the former is “worth” more, and that is because the denominators (Hyatt point, Hilton point) are different.

    What everyone does after coming up with the individual points currency values in cents/”point” is to treat the denominator as if all “points” are equivalent or the same and simpy compare the magnitudes of the numerators (the “cents”) directly. Well, you cannot do that because while a cent is a cent, a “point” in one program (e.g., WoH) is not the same as a “point” in an another program (e.g., HH) because different programs award different numbers of points for the same number of cents spent. Thus, one must first do a points currency conversion to account for that difference in points earned per cents spent across programs.

    Here is an illustration of how that’s done:

    A HH Diamond with the AMEX HH Aspire (AF: $95) earns 32 HH/$
    A WoH Globalist with the Chase WoH visa (AF: $95) earns 10.5 WoH/$.

    One assumption:
    because when Hilton sells its points with a 100% bonus each point costs $0.005, and based on my own experience booking countess Hilton awards, I believe that Hilton values its point currency at $0.005 each.

    With that,we are ready to do a points currency conversion that will tell us the equivalence between a Hilton point and Hyatt point adjusted for differences in earn rates.

    $1 buys you 32HH points
    $1 buys you 10.5 WoH points

    Therefore

    32 HH = 10.5 WoH
    or
    32HH/10.5WoH = 1 (called unitary factor)

    To go from HH points to WoH points we will use something called “dimensional analysis”, which is simply that if one multiplies any number by 1, one can change its unit of measure but not it’s VALUE. So, we can go from $0.005/HH to $/WoH — the points currency conversion — using the same trick:

    $0.005/HH * 32HH/10.5WoH = $0.015/WoH

    See what we did? We just converted the units from $/HH to $/WoH without changibg the value $0.005/HH because all we did was to multiply $0.005/HH by (32HH/10.5) which, as we established above, is equal to 1, the unitary factor. The result is that

    $O.005/HH point = $0.015/WoH point

    You can repeat the same conversion for all the other points currencies, which I did. Then after some simple curvefitting I came up with the general analytical equation for calculating values of hotel points currencies from only a program’s best base earn rate estimate.

    I have given away more than I’d intended to but here’s a teaser
    1. I did rigorous validation of the math and flawless and informative.especially about which values of base earn rates to use.
    2. I assessed how my analytical approach compares with the mean values of points published by (VFTW+OMAAT+TPG)/3.
    3. I established whose values among those published by the 3 blogs are the most reliable (closer to the analytical values).
    4. [ extended the modeling to include Wyndham Rewards, Choice Privilege, and defunct SPG, with very very interesting, even startling insights.

    So, stay tuned for the complete magnum opus !!!

  9. @DCS – you ‘assume’ all hotel chains offer equivalent rebate value and work backwards to a value per point, at least from the comment I saw earlier.

    Clarification: the assumption was that when adjusted for differences in earn rates, all points currencies would end up being worth the same, and I suspected that from the very first time I saw the values years ago. What I finally did with too much free time during the pandemic was the modeling to establish rigorously whether (1) my assumption would hold and (2) relationship can be generalized and expressed analytically. That rebates were the same just automatically fell out of the modeling, to prove that all points currencies are worth exactly the same.

  10. @DCS – you ‘assume’ all hotel chains offer equivalent rebate value and work backwards to a value per point, at least from the comment I saw earlier.

    Clarification: the assumption was that when adjusted for differences in earn rates, all points currencies would end up being worth the same, and I suspected that from the very first time I saw the values years ago. What I finally did with too much free time during the pandemic was the modeling to establish rigorously whether (1) my assumption would hold and (2) relationship can be generalized and expressed analytically. That rebates were the same just automatically fell out of the modeling, to prove that all points currencies are worth exactly the same.

  11. About unit conversion by “dimensional analysis”

    Here are simpler and more intuitive examples of how unit conversion without changing the value of a quantity can be done using “dimensional analysis”.

    Convert 5000 in the unit of cents to the unit of dollars without changing the value of 5000cents:

    1 dollar = 100 cents

    1 dollar/100cents = 1, the unitary factor

    Thus,
    5000 cents * [1 dollar/100 cents] = 50 dollars.

    We essentially just multiplied 5000cents by 1, i.e., [1 dollar/ 100cents], while converting ‘cents’ to ‘dollars’ without changing the value: 5000 cents are equal to 50 dollars.

    The quantity [1 dollar/100 cents] is obviously equal 1. It is the “unitary factor”, just like
    32HH points/10.5WoH points = 1 in my example above.

    A slightly more complex but more relevant example of “dimensional analysis”.

    Let’s convert 0.5 cents/liter to cents/gallon (akin to converting cents/Hilton point to cents/Hyatt point)

    Its known that 1 gallon = 3.8 liters = volumes are exactly the same.

    Thus: 1 gallon/3.8liters = 3.8liters/1gallon = 1, the unitary factor.

    0.5 cent/liter * 3.8 liters/galon = 1.3 cents/gallon

    We have changed the units from cents/liter to cents/gallon without changing the value of 0.5cents/liter because we just multiplied it by 1! Thus,

    0.5 cents/liter = 1.3 cents/gallon

    You cannot compare gas prices of 0.5 cent/liter vs. 1.3 cents/gallon and claim that the former “costs less” by simply comparing the cents and ignoring the gallon and litter in the denominators! The reality is that two gas prices are exactly the same (get you exactly the same volume of gas), just like 0.5cent/HH = 1.5cents/WoH point are “worth” exactly the same.

    Q.E.D.

    As you can see, it is math is rather trivial, both literally and figuratively.

    Instead of reporting values of points in cents/point and have people begin comparing just the ‘cents’ directly because the assume wrongly that a ‘point’ is a ‘point’, things will be much clearer if the values of points are reported with the points currency denomination explicitly included in the denominator, like,

    0.5cents/HH or 1.5cents/WoH

    as that would make it clear that the two values, like cents/gallon and cents/liter cannot be directly compare because they are in different units of measurement.

    G’day
    .

  12. The lengths some people will go to justify the conclusion that Hilton has the best program…

    @Dan — Please don’t be ridiculous. Read the material and learn something, if you are even capable of understanding it, which is not at all certain considering the asinine comment.

    If the purpose were to “justify the conclusion that Hilton has the best program”, I would have claimed that the result of the modeling have shown that Hilton’s point is more valuable than any other, which ain’t the case.

    The material you are trying to pooh-pooh is quite likely the most significant in the history of travel blogosphere, considering the universal misunderstanding of hotel points currencies.

    Say something smart or do me a favor and get lost.

  13. @DCS – Telling people who disagree with you how stupid they are is a wonderful way to win influence. Keep it up. You’re doing great.

  14. @Dan — I have no desire to influence anyone like you. You came here and made an utterly ridiculous comment about material that anyone who can read and understand it would find to be extremely valuable (it will change how people have viewed hotel points currencies up to now), and would know that it has absolutely nothing to do with Hilton specifically or any particular program.

    We’re done. Please get lost.

  15. You’ve started from a conclusion (rebate value on stays is the same between programs) and backed into the point values required to support it. That’s a huge assumption and one that I don’t think many people would agree with, yet you present it as though it’s obviously correct. It isn’t.

  16. @Dan — Do not speak about things that you know nothing about. You are regurgitating what @Gary thought my approach was, when I already explained to him that the constant “rebate” (unlike his that are variable and utterly wrong) emerges automatically from the modeling (follow the link!) to validate the assumption that all points are worth the same when adjusted for differences in base earn rates. That is the assumption. No one, not @Gary, knows what is the approach, which is based on the scientific method and is flawless.

    Proof that what you surmise, based on @Gary’s erroneous supposition, is total b.s.: please explain the analytical equation that correctly calculates the values of 5 hotel points currencies based solely on each program’s base earn rate (follow the link!) .

    The more you speak, the more you reveal your cluelessness.

    G’day.

  17. It would seem that way to one who is utterly clueless. It was clear from the get-go that you were way in over your head, so, of course, the highly erudite material would appear to you like “delusions of grandeur” and NPD, but do you know what? That does not change the fact that it is flawless science and a “game changer” in the medium.

  18. I hope you are able to get the help you so desperately need before you hurt yourself or someone around you.

  19. You sounds like my good ol’ friend ‘Mikey’, who suddenly fizzled out and disappeared. I sort of thought it was good riddance, actually.

    There is little doubt about who is in need of help. I do neuroscience research on folks just like you and the psychopathology is unmistakable. Go troll someone else now…

  20. Off topic from comments, on topic to post:

    Would non stay restaurant spend generate base points that count toward lifetime status (assuming restaurant participates in this promo)? I realize the bonus points wouldn’t count.

  21. New York Bar at Park Hyatt Tokyo was easily the worst meal we had in Tokyo (though it was fine). There are more Michelin-starred restaurants in that city than any other in the world; no need to spend close to the same money to eat at a perfectly fine but by no means exceptional version of a U.S. steak house. The view and the “kind of cool to be in the place from ‘Lost in Translation”” can be achieved by going there for a pre- or post-dinner cocktail.

    Here in SF, though, even less reason to be excited about this — unless drinks at the bar at Hotel Kabuki count.

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