Marriott Dynamic Award Pricing Devaluation Starts March 29, Will Be Worse In 2023

Marriott has shared that they’re dropping award charts in March and moving to dynamic pricing. We now know that the date this goes into effect will be March 29, though the transition will be gradual and spread into March 30. And we also know how much more expensive some properties may become.

Dynamic pricing means no longer getting great value for points. There may be times when you’ll get better value (when rates are low and award prices used to be high). In those case you shouldn’t have spent points, and spent cash instead. Now the ‘great values’ of the past will start to go away, since redemption prices will rise to meet higher rates.

They’re easing members into this. In 2022 most redemption prices will stay within the same range of current categories which are:

However for about 200 hotels (full list, .pdf) point ranges will go outside of current off-peak and peak pricing. For instance,

  • Price ranges will vary by up to 10,000 points more at The Ritz-Carlton and St. Regis Langkawi; JW Marriott and Westin Los Cabos; Ritz-Carlton Cancun; Marriott Sanibel Harbour; Ritz-Carlton Orlando, Grande Lakes; Westin Hapuna Beach Resort; W Fort Lauderdale

  • Price ranges will vary by up to 20,000 points more at The Westin Turtle Bay Resort & Spa, Mauritius; Le Meridien and Ritz-Carlton Maldives; St. Regis Bora Bora; Ritz-Carlton Grand Cayman, St. Thomas, and Turks and Caicos; St. Regis Bahia Beach Resort; the Sardinian gems of Cala di Volpe, Hotel Romazzino, and Hotel Pitrizza; Mystique and Santa Marina in the Greek Islands; Gritti Palace in Venice and Mardavall in Mallorca; St. Regis Punta Mita; Al Maha; Phoenician Residences and Canyon Suites; Ritz-Carlton Bal Harbour, New York Central Park and NoMad; Bachelor Gulch; Kapalua; Lake Tahoe and Naples; St. Regis Aspen, Bal Harbour, Deer Valley and New York; W South Beach

  • Price ranges will vary by up to 30,000 points more at Ritz-Carlton Koh Samui; Westin Grand Cayman and St. John; Paris Marriott Champs Elysees; Renaissance Paris Arc de Triomphe and Paris Vendome; Bodrum and West Hollywood EDITION; The Jaffa Tel Aviv; Grand Bohemian Asheville and Charleston; JW Marriott Essex House and Marco Island Resort; Ritz-Carlton Santa Barbara, Georgetown, Fort Lauderdale, Half Moon Bay, Laguna Niguel and Sarasota; Westin Maui, Westin Princeville Ocean Resort; Wailea Beach Resort.


Al Maha Desert Resort

Moreover “about 40 hotels” in this group of 200 “may rise above the bounds of the previous Category Eight during peak/busier travel times.” We’re going to be seeing 130,000 point per night redemptions.

Marriott emphasizes that it’s ‘only 3%’ of hotels that are going to get more expensive than they can be under current award charts, but in large measure it’s the ones you may actually want to redeem.

Many of the ‘good spots’ in Mexico and the Caribbean, nice hotels in the U.S., values in the Maldives and special places like Al Maha and Cala di Volpe are going to go up and potentially by quite a lot. And that’s just in 2022, when they’re clearly trying to limit the impact members feel right away from this change.

While my read is that in 2023 all gloves are off that is decidedly not Marriott’s narrative. A spokesperson offers,

For stays in 2023, we are focusing on ensuring even our most aspirational properties offer a mix of great rates during the year. Changes in rates for stays in 2023 above or below the high low range for stays in 2022 are planned to be incremental.

Marriott Bonvoy Senior Vice President David Flueck previously shared with me that we’re also going to see prices fluctuate more frequently. When they launched off-peak and peak pricing three years ago, they were adjusting prices about once a month. Going forward it will happen more regularly than just once a month.

The one positive in all of this is that as hotels become more expensive, free night awards become easier to use, and that “by the end of April” it will be possible to top off Free Night Award certificates with up to 15,000 points per night – so a 35,000 point certificate can be used for up to a 50,000 point redemption for instance.

About Gary Leff

Gary Leff is one of the foremost experts in the field of miles, points, and frequent business travel - a topic he has covered since 2002. Co-founder of frequent flyer community InsideFlyer.com, emcee of the Freddie Awards, and named one of the "World's Top Travel Experts" by Conde' Nast Traveler (2010-Present) Gary has been a guest on most major news media, profiled in several top print publications, and published broadly on the topic of consumer loyalty. More About Gary »

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  1. I fully anticipate 200,000 or 250,000 points per night at all of the legit aspirational, 5-star hotels by 2023. And if Courtyard costs the same as the Marriott in D.C., I’m staying at the Marriott. I think this could really hurt some of the mediocre brands because who wants to use points for a Fairfield or Courtyard? People tolerate crap hotels because they gets points that can be redeemed at nice hotels. If the points are worthless or can’t be redeemed, I might as well as just stay at the Best Western in Sioux City.

  2. I don’t know why any frequent traveler would continue giving business to Marriott. Bonvoy started with weak elite offerings & poor redemption to begin with and with this change they continue to make your points more & more worthless. Even Hilton looks great by comparison.

  3. FNT Delta Diamond – the thing is, the Courtyard is often newer, nicer, and better located than the comparable Marriott

  4. @sean – as long as folks continue to book with Marriott and use the credit cards , Marriott will continue to push the limits on devaluation. The only thing that could possibly stop the rolling devaluation of the program is a revenue hit .

    In my opinion , It’s pretty clear that the property owners run the show and the corporate execs operate at the whim of property owners It is possible that the owners don’t like the level of reimbursement they get for award bookings and might not be happy to provide benefits on award stays = continued devaluation.

  5. Maxie, it is exactly as you say and I’ve been singing that song for a while now. Yet, the hamsters remain addicted to the points / tier status wheel. The hamsters continually try to justify why they should still play the rigged game . . . or argue how the other chain’s (rigged) game is somehow better . . . like addicts, they can’t let go.

    So, I again say that anyone who cares about this is still playing their rigged game. And, after all of the articles about all of the garbage they pull, anyone who is still playing their rigged game deserves what they get.

  6. So sad to see the program becoming even more crappy. Marriott sure is determined to remove any trace of value for customers.

  7. BonVoid slams it to you once again
    Sky high redemptions combined with denied late check outs and meager or no breakfast
    Have it our way folks
    We love fools ooops we mean our non valued guests
    Keep on paying as we love keeping your dollars in The Marriott Bonvoid Ponzi Scheme

  8. Bonvoyed by Marriott while opening email from Ambassador located in China. Blocker prevented three encrypted email trackers.

    Complaints to corporate were passed on to OCA. They do not care.

    Recently successfully in collecting $100 (compensation) plus points owed for property failing to offer breakfast when lounge was closed.

  9. Does anyone know if Marriott is dropping the 5th night free provision when redeeming points?

    Having been a MR member since the program inception, it’s sad to see how the program has been destroyed. At the same time, it’s sad to see how Marriott Corporation has lost total control.

    Between my wife and myself, we recently dropped a total of 5 Marriott branded cards between Chase and AMEX. We now have one AMEX. We are traveling more but using other brands much more often. I had 20 suite night upgrades certs and was just able to use one in Santiago Chile. First time in about 20 attempts.

  10. Dynamic pricing means no longer getting great value for points.

    — Gary Leff

    Prove the claim while I easily and factually disprove it.

    I just thought about traveling to San Juan, PR, a yearly destination of mine a few years back where I have not been in over 5 years. So, I did a search for awards, a quickly found availability galore at Caribe Hilton.

    Here are real data:

    Revenue room rate $490/night
    Standard award cost: 60K/night
    Nominal redemption value: $490/60K = $0.00817 or 0.817cents/HH point.
    See that, outsized redemption value, even nominally.

    Now for 5 nights (March 3-8, 2022):
    Total cash cost (including taxes and fees): $2899
    Cost for 5-night award (5th night free): 240,000
    Actual Redemption value: $2,899/240,000 = $0.0121, or 1.21 cents/Hilton point (that’s like getting 3.6 cents/.Hyatt point).

    See that, the actual or real redemption value is even more outsized.

    Dynamic pricing means no longer getting great value for points.

    Yeah, right.

    BTW, before continuing to make such bogus statements about dynamic award pricing, consider this: Hyatt just massively devalued their high-end awards, and the program does not even use dynamic award pricing.

    Funny how much damage can be done in broad daylight even with a fixed award chart, ain’t it?

  11. The demise of Marriott’s so-called loyalty program is nearly complete. For years, I kept up my platinum status because I valued late checkouts, lounge access, suite night upgrades, and opportunities to use my points for vacation stays at aspirational properties. Last year, I found many lounges closed, my late checkout asks were. denied, and suite nights were “unavailable” even at half-empty hotels. Hefty resort fees on award stays added insult to injury. “Dynamic” pricing is the final cherry on the excrement sundae.

    I decided to give Hilton a try, mostly because there aren’t Hyatt options in many of the places that work takes me. So far, I’m impressed. On the higher end, the Conrads I’ve been to have been well-run and my late checkout requests have been granted without hassles. (I’m only Gold). On the lower end, I find HGIs more appealing than Courtyards. I’m racking up a decent stash of points and look forward to redeeming them without resort fees. Hilton’s program may not be as lavish as Hyatt Globalist or as beneficial as the platinum status Marriott once promised. But I’d encourage business travelers to give it a try if you’re tired of feeling gypped by Marriott. You might be surprised.

  12. Most Hilton’s have exceeded their remodel time of 7 years. Many are old and run down.

    The front desk at the new Conrad in Vegas puts comments about guests in the computer. One comment said “his family is large and rude” (from another guest in hotel).

  13. Because their properties are newer, clean, have been remodeled, and more choices (and openings).

    ………
    I don’t know why any frequent traveler would continue giving business to Marriott. Bonvoy started with weak elite

  14. “Dynamic” pricing is the final cherry on the excrement sundae.
    ….
    ….
    I decided to give Hilton a try, mostly because there aren’t Hyatt options in many of the places that work takes me. So far, I’m impressed. On the higher end, the Conrads I’ve been to have been well-run and my late checkout requests have been granted without hassles. (I’m only Gold).

    You realized that you just contradicted yourself, right.? Hilton has been using dynamic award pricing since 2017, and, yet, you just disparaged Marriott for adopting the scheme, while being “impressed” with Hilton?!

    Hilton’s program may not be as lavish as Hyatt Globalist or as beneficial as the platinum status Marriott once promised. But I’d encourage business travelers to give it a try if you’re tired of feeling gypped by Marriott. You might be surprised.

    The only people who would be “surprised” with or by Hilton Honors are those like you who drunk too much of the kool-aid about how Hilton is awful and Hyatt is tops, based on nothing but made-up and self-serving standard of “excellence.”

    Hyatt Globalist cannot possibly be “lavish” when it does not get the 4th or 5th award night free — unquestionably, the single most valuable perk in hotel loyalty. You see the redemption value I just calculated above for a 5-night award stay at Caribe Hilton? That would be like getting 3.2 cents/Hyatt point. How often do WoH Globalists get such outsized value at non-aspirational properties or even there? I am not sure how you compare Marriott Platinum with your HH Gold status and think that Marriott Platinum is more “beneficial”. Wait until you are a Hilton Diamond before making such claims.

    Bottom line: You should consider hanging it up because it does not seem like you are playing in the right league…

  15. Most Hilton’s have exceeded their remodel time of 7 years. Many are old and run down.

    @Tom, in 2017, there were 76 properties participating in Hilton Honors in China, today there are 442;
    UK 126 in 2017, 150 today;
    Thailand 8, 14 today;
    Maldives 1, today 3;
    and so on.

    The claim about “most” Hilton’s being dated is simply a fabrication.

  16. Hilton reference was for US. International properties are usually nice. Look at the Hilton SNA airport, Garden Inn Scottsdale (been 14 years since remodel) Palm Springs-the list goes on.

    Here is a new property for Hilton to use points-
    Scottsdale’s newest resort hotel will be coming soon to Cavasson. The Hilton North Scottsdale at Cavasson will feature six-stories of elegantly appointed guest rooms, resort-style amenities and a sophisticated event space. The 237-room state-of-the-art, full-service hotel will be nestled within Cavasson, just minutes from downtown Scottsdale and 20 miles from Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport. Designed to exceed the expectations of business and leisure travelers in this exclusive market, standout features include rooftop executive lounges, a bar overlooking the stunning McDowell Mountains, guest rooms with spectacular balconies, a luxurious resort-style outdoor swimming pool and lush landscaping throughout. The property will also feature a 15,000-square-foot elegant event center, positioned perfectly to serve as the venue for events ranging from small group meetings to large corporate gatherings and weddings and social affairs of all sizes.

    Construction is well underway with anticipated completion in late 2022.

  17. The Hilton reference was for US. International properties are usually nice. Look at the Hilton SNA airport, Garden Inn Scottsdale (been 14 years since remodel) Palm Springs-the list goes on.

    Here is a new property for Hilton to use points-
    Scottsdale’s newest resort hotel will be coming soon to Cavasson. The Hilton North Scottsdale at Cavasson will feature six-stories of elegantly appointed guest rooms, resort-style amenities and a sophisticated event space. The 237-room state-of-the-art, full-service hotel will be nestled within Cavasson, just minutes from downtown Scottsdale and 20 miles from Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport. Designed to exceed the expectations of business and leisure travelers in this exclusive market, standout features include rooftop executive lounges, a bar overlooking the stunning McDowell Mountains, guest rooms with spectacular balconies, a luxurious resort-style outdoor swimming pool and lush landscaping throughout. The property will also feature a 15,000-square-foot elegant event center, positioned perfectly to serve as the venue for events ranging from small group meetings to large corporate gatherings and weddings and social affairs of all sizes.

    Construction is well underway with anticipated completion in late 2022.

  18. Hey DCS…

    “You realized that you just contradicted yourself, right.? Hilton has been using dynamic award pricing since 2017, and, yet, you just disparaged Marriott for adopting the scheme”

    Hilton has been transparent about it for years and has other benefits I’m finding worthwhile. I’m disparaging Marriott for adding it to a growing list of cutbacks in their so-called loyalty program.

    ” I am not sure how you compare Marriott Platinum with your HH Gold status and think that Marriott Platinum is more “beneficial”.

    I don’t. What Marriott ONCE PROMISED was more beneficial than Hilton Gold, at least to me. But they no longer deliver on those promises.

    “Bottom line: You should consider hanging it up because it does not seem like you are playing in the right league…”

    I’m not playing in any league. I’m just a semi-frequent business traveler looking to get a few perks, stay in quality hotels, and get a bit of bang for his redemption buck on vacations. I’m finding Hilton to be a better fit for those needs lately. It’s a welcome change from Marriott and I’m pleasantly surprised by how well I’ve been treated with only minimal Gold status. I have no intention of “hanging it up” and quitting Hilton, nor do I understand such advice. Hell, I’m seriously considering picking up an Aspire card so that I can jump up to Diamond and rack up points faster.

    If I’ve read some of your posts correctly, don’t you prefer Hilton’s program to the others? If so, why knock someone less experienced for reaching the same conclusion?

  19. If I’ve read some of your posts correctly, don’t you prefer Hilton’s program to the others? If so, why knock someone less experienced for reaching the same conclusion?

    My interest is in accuracy or in “telling it like it is.” When someone repeats made-up claims as if they were established facts I intervene. Though you “embraced” Hilton, it was like you were just falling back on a so-so program because “better” programs turned out to be a disappointment. But the reality is that those purportedly “better” programs that turned out to be a disappointment were never better to start with. They were just claimed to be better…

  20. Keep in mind these are viewpoints from travelers with different needs. It’s more helpful to post additional information to supplement prior posts than to say their information was fabricated or call someone out.

  21. Except that is not how the information is presented. It is never a viewpoint. It is always presented as an affirmation or an established fact, even when it is fabricated or can be easily shown to have been simply made up.

  22. DCS: “My interest is in accuracy or in “telling it like it is.””

    Maybe someday you’ll start doing that, DCS, rather than your usual tactic of throwing a temper tantrum anytime someone says something you disagree with.

  23. Even a broken record stops when the phonograph runs out of juice. Not this person who’s been repeating the same line for 2-3 years, without ever substantiating any inaccuracies in my posts.
    You have no credibility, so please spare me your usual fact-free, dissertation-length retorts..

    Goodbye.

  24. I’ve been a Marriott Bonvoy Platinum since the Starwood acquisition, and initially was happy with the program. However my enthusiasm only lasted for about a year at best. It’s very clear now that the old Starwood Guest program was cleanly Customer focused, and the Marriott Bonvoy program is slavishly focused solely on the owner/franchisee’s bottom line, and top level Marriott management freely admits it! As a World of Hyatt Globalist I find Marriott Bonvoy to be missing the mark in many areas. Agree with the reader who noted that the Courtyards are in many instances newer and better than many of the top tier Marriott properties.

  25. i am canadian, and have been a bonvoy member for 2 + years now. i an retired so when i travel its for leisure and for weeks at a time. i rarely use hotels as i usuallly use airbnb’s. so maybe i stay 1 or 2 nights in a hotel in a year and i find my amex annual fee is worth the free night i get. my point is there might be a market for alot of infrequent travellers that will not notice the move to devalue or it wont affect them to make them change. if i were a business traveller or could afford the high end hotels, i guess i would feel your pain. thanks for the article, gary

  26. April is basically over, and I’m guessing Marriott isn’t going to introduce topping-up free night certificates tomorrow on a Saturday. Nice work, Bonvoy! Way to meet expectations by not meeting expectations. #Bonvoyed

  27. Oops, I was wrong. Just saw on Frequent Miler that it went live today on Marriott.com.

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