Official American Airlines Black Lives Matter Pins Now Available, See Them On Your Next Flight?

American Airlines courted controversy when they began allowing employees to wear makeshift ‘Black Lives Matter’ pins. The airline has a number of pins designating affinity for certain causes and groups, but hasn’t allowed ‘unofficial’ pins of any kind to be worn except this one.

While the airline has gone to lengths to emphasize that they do not support any organization Black Lives Matter, they definitely support the notion that black lives do matter. And they made an exception to their normal rule on flair for this cause, until they could develop an official pin.

The official Black Lives Matter pin is now available for American Airlines employees. It’s called “Stand for Change” and “celebrates the diversity of our team members and our customers.”

[W]e work hard to create an open, inclusive culture where people from all backgrounds feel welcome. Racial justice is an important value at American, as is supporting our team, including those who want to convey their support for their Black colleagues and Black Americans.

As such, our Black Professional Network (BPN), developed a pin to convey this important message. This new pin features the American Airlines logo along with the message: Stand for Change.

We Believe Black Lives Matter. While American isn’t expressing support for specific organizations, we stand in solidarity with the movement for equality and justice for Black Americans who continue to experience racism and discrimination.

Now that there’s an official pin, it joins “more than a dozen optional [Employee Business Resource Group] pins that team members can choose to wear on their uniforms” including “a Christian cross, a PRIDE flag, a Star of David, as well as pins for our Family Matters and Veterans resource groups.”

Employees can order up to 3 pins, but may wear only one at a time. Shipping begins November 2, and orders are only being taken through November 13. After that the company will no longer assist employees in expressing their support for Black Lives Matter, it seems. (And once an official pin is widely available, interim or makeshift pins will no longer be permitted.)

Each work group has different rules for wearing pins.

  • Flight Service “can wear up to three pins, 1-inch or smaller, on the outermost garment
    of their uniform. Buttons are not permitted at any time.”

    Allowed pins are: Company-issued anniversary or award pins; Union pin; choice of an Employee Business Interest Group pin, an American flag pin, UNICEF or Wings Foundation pin.

  • Customer Service and Premium Guest Services “can wear up to three pins, 1-inch or smaller, on the outermost garment of their uniform. Buttons are not permitted at any time.”

    Allowed pins are: Company-issued anniversary or award pins; Union pin; choice of an Employee Business Interest Group pin or an American flag pin

  • Flight pilots “can wear up to three approved insignia on the jacket lapel.”

    Allowed are: Company-issued anniversary; Union pin; American flag pin; Chairman’s Award pin; Snowball Express pin; Order of Eagle pin; Chief’s pin.

  • Fleet Service “”may wear up to three pins, 1-inch or smaller, at one time on a uniform shirt. Pins are not allowed to be placed on lanyards. Buttons are not permitted.”

    Allowed pins are: Company-issued anniversary or award pins; Union pin; choice of an Employee Business Interest Group pin or an American flag pin

  • Tech Ops “may wear up to three pins, 1-inch or smaller, at one time on work clothing or hats. Pins may be worn in the company uniform. Pins are not allowed to be placed on lanyards or badge
    holders. Buttons are not permitted.”

    Allowed pins are: Company-issued anniversary or award pins; Union pin; choice of an Employee Business Interest Group pin or an American flag pin

About Gary Leff

Gary Leff is one of the foremost experts in the field of miles, points, and frequent business travel - a topic he has covered since 2002. Co-founder of frequent flyer community InsideFlyer.com, emcee of the Freddie Awards, and named one of the "World's Top Travel Experts" by Conde' Nast Traveler (2010-Present) Gary has been a guest on most major news media, profiled in several top print publications, and published broadly on the topic of consumer loyalty. More About Gary »

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Comments

  1. If AA can manage to provide, consistently, a level of service that respects the customer’s dignity – the customer is not always right, but the customer is always the customer – then for all I care, employees can wear as many pins espousing as many views as they like.

  2. We used to have a special pin to award to cabin crews who thoroughly cleaned their planes, but no one every claimed these pins so we added shareholder value by selling them as jewelry in an impoverished country. If you visit, you can see the natives wearing “American Airlines Cleanliness Award” pins on their “World Champion Seattle Mariners” t-shirts.

  3. Its truly a shame that an organization like American airlines can’t or won’t understand a fundamental principle that ALL LIVES MATTER. I never knew the value of my life was ranked by my airline according to race. Supporting this type of domestic terrorism is sick and disgusting

  4. Imagine if an airline authorized “White lives matters” or “Christian lives matters”.

    Bad move AA. This is a race to the bottom. Who can suck up to liberal causes the best???

  5. It must be nice for John Moore and Tyrone to look down upon us from their white aryan perch and proclaim that some of their best friends are black and so racism doesn’t exist.

  6. Hey AA – employees only limited to three pieces of “flair”?

    I think you need to wear at least 20 pieces of “flair” here at Chotchkees restaurant…

    Any Office Space fans out there?

  7. @jason
    But did AA employees turn their TPS reports in time? We have to make it racist to require them from now on.

  8. Those breaking really law with looting should be prosecuted.

    For those who see this as racism in reverse, don’t get it. Where was ALL LIVES MATTER from 1619-1968? One of many examples exist…..IF IT WERE TRUE THAT ALL LIVES READ HISTORY OF BLACK PEOPLE.
    Here’s one for you
    Dred Scott v Sandford Judgment reversed and suit dismissed for lack of jurisdiction.
    Persons of African descent cannot be and were never intended to be citizens under the US Constitution. Plaintiff is without standing to file a suit.

    Was this Christian? Was this a true interpretation of constitution as it was intended?

  9. This has always been one of my favorite dumpsters on fire. Just checking in to make sure it’s still burning…oh hell yes, and the firefighters are watching with glee. White guys pissed about taxes, regulation, anything to right historical wrongs (hey I didn’t do it, I can’t be responsible for what my granddad did), and devaluation of whatever favorite travel currency is. All the other colors and women (I don’t think those people exist here, really) either wanting desperately to be white guys or pissed they aren’t. And chief of the brigade making a few pesos/rupees/rubles pitching some card while drinking a cocktail, watching the fire burn and reminding us it was Fauci who first said we don’t need to wear masks.

  10. Great post Tyrone. Please ignore the radicals like Pete who can only attempt to silence others by humiliation, when someone doesn’t share they’re narrow viewpoint. BLM is not a worthy cause. Read their platform if you disagree. All lives Matter would be a better suggestion or for that matter just stay out of social issues all together.

  11. Following up on Amazing Larry….
    Why doesn’t AA go the whole nine yards…Take take the American Flag off their aircraft and then paint all of them black.

  12. Some businesses have an irrational fear of offending ANY member of one or our many victim groups. I have a news flash for them–This won’t make a professional victim happy. He will just find some other minor or non-existent offence and use it for his extortion.
    The motto of the US was “E Pluribus Unum.” It’s now “I’m special; You owe me: Give me.”

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