How Runways are Named and New Loyalty Program Coming for Four Seasons

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About Gary Leff

Gary Leff is one of the foremost experts in the field of miles, points, and frequent business travel - a topic he has covered since 2002. Co-founder of frequent flyer community InsideFlyer.com, emcee of the Freddie Awards, and named one of the "World's Top Travel Experts" by Conde' Nast Traveler (2010-Present) Gary has been a guest on most major news media, profiled in several top print publications, and published broadly on the topic of consumer loyalty. More About Gary »

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Comments

  1. KLAX has four parallel runways, so “L C R” doesn’t work there. Instead, for the common approach (from the east), the south-side runways are 25L and 25R (relatively correct), while the north-side runways are 24L and 24R (off by 10 degrees). And KSJC used to have a small bizjet runway to the left (coming from the south) of 30L (the main runway) and 30R (a bit smaller) called just 29. Looks like that got torn up sometime since the dot-com boom, which was the last time I flew in there.

    (PP-ASEL-IA with 270+ hours in the left seat, instrument rated, high-performance, retract)

  2. I’m surprised they actually change the numbering over time to match shifts in magnetic north. The numbering isn’t there as a reference to set your compass by, but rather as a check to make sure you’re on the right runway. No airport is likely to have runways almost-parallel enough that being a few degrees out could cause confusion, or if they do they should be using the L/C/R designation.

    As for naming more than three parallel runways, everything’s bigger in Texas – including the number of parallel runways. At DFW, five of its seven runways are parallel, and have designations of 17L/35R, 17C/35C, 17R/35L, 18L/36R, 18R/36L.

  3. “The numbering isn’t there as a reference to set your compass by, but rather as a check to make sure you’re on the right runway.” But it *is* close enough that we are trained to do *exactly* that, especially to make sure our downwind and base leg are appropriate.

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