The Future of Taxes on Miles and Woman Struggles With Luggage Cart, Video Goes Viral

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About Gary Leff

Gary Leff is one of the foremost experts in the field of miles, points, and frequent business travel - a topic he has covered since 2002. Co-founder of frequent flyer community InsideFlyer.com, emcee of the Freddie Awards, and named one of the "World's Top Travel Experts" by Conde' Nast Traveler (2010-Present) Gary has been a guest on most major news media, profiled in several top print publications, and published broadly on the topic of consumer loyalty. More About Gary »

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Comments

  1. As I reside in a very “True Blue” state, the tax increases just keep coming. If the credit cards/airlines claim value for miles provided, they will likely be gross overestimates. For example, both AA and UA value their own miles at between 2.0-2.4 cents apiece. Try cashing these in for flights. In my experience, AA miles have been worth about 0.9 cents per mile. Let’s hope that we won’t need to go down the path of taxing miles.

  2. Personally, while it’s clear service animals are legit, it sure seems to me like “emotional support” animals are a scam to allow people to bring their animals. If the need *is* legit, let’s require that the emotional support animal be muzzled while traveling. I’m sure they can provide emotional support when unable to bite other travelers. Or, let’s just get rid of the concept of emotional support animals at all. If you can’t travel without your pit bull, perhaps that means you can’t travel.

  3. All miles that are earned for a flight/hotelstay that is also expensed as a tax deductible expense should be taxed as income. All miles earned from flying for work, should be taxed as income.

  4. “If you… earn 5,000 bonus points or frequent flier miles if you spend a certain amount of money within three months of opening the card account, that’s not taxable”

    Wrong. Earning a signup bonus of only 5,000 points or miles is clearly an idiot tax.

  5. It’s seems to be a bad cart. Who is supposed to help her and how?

    Why is this even worthy of being on this blog, probably happens everywhere every day.

    What did I miss?

  6. How can miles be taxes as income. Miles are a discount on spending. That is just like going into a store that has jeans list priced at $100 with a 50% off sale, making the jeans $50 and then taxing $50 difference as income. For oldsters, that is just like the Beatles song Taxman. Sheese.

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