What Does Hyatt’s New All-Inclusive Chart Mean For Legacy Hotel Redemption Prices?

Hyatt introduced a new award chart for all-inclusive properties on Monday as it began onboarding 100 Apple Leisure Group hotels, across 7 brands, into the World of Hyatt program.

There are (6) categories – labeled A through F to avoid confusion with categories 1-8 in the regular award chart – and 6 new hotels have joined the program already with 50 more coming May 9 and then European all-inclusives following. All currently-available hotels are either in the second (b) or third (c) categories:

Creating this new chart meant adding existing Hyatt Ziva and Zilara all-inclusive brands into it as well. All of these hotels were already 20,000 or 25,000 points per night for a standard room and on their own separate chart.

Hyatt Senior Vice President Amy Weinberg told me there would not be “a lot of change for existing all-inclusives.” Now that they’ve been folded into the new all-inclusive chart let’s look at what happened to their pricing:

Property Name Category Standard Points Required Old Chart Pricing
Hyatt Zilara Cancun C                      25,000                      25,000
Hyatt Zilara Rose Hall C                      25,000                      25,000
Hyatt Zilara Cap Cana C                      25,000                      25,000
Hyatt Ziva Cancun C                      25,000                      25,000
Hyatt Ziva Riviera Cancun C                      25,000                      25,000
Hyatt Ziva Rose Hall C                      25,000                      25,000
Hyatt Ziva Cap Cana C                      25,000                      25,000
Hyatt Ziva Puerto Vallarta C                      25,000                      20,000
Hyatt Ziva Los Cabos B                      20,000                      20,000

As you can see from this chart, only Hyatt Ziva Puerto Vallarta has changed pricing, going from 20,000 points per night to 25,000 points per night. Hyatt tells me, though, that Hyatt Ziva Puerto Vallarta will be moving to Category B at 20,000 points in the next week.

I have to give Hyatt a lot of credit here. My first instinct is to wonder whether assigning existing all-inclusives to a new award chart would be an opportunity to raise the price of redemptions. Surely at most programs it would be! And they have not done this here.

About Gary Leff

Gary Leff is one of the foremost experts in the field of miles, points, and frequent business travel - a topic he has covered since 2002. Co-founder of frequent flyer community InsideFlyer.com, emcee of the Freddie Awards, and named one of the "World's Top Travel Experts" by Conde' Nast Traveler (2010-Present) Gary has been a guest on most major news media, profiled in several top print publications, and published broadly on the topic of consumer loyalty. More About Gary »

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Comments

  1. Another example of why Hyatt gets the vast majority of my hotel loyalty. I am a Globalist with Hyatt and have been treated well. I now participate only anecdotally with Hilton, and then even less so, only when I have to, Marriott. I will support brands that reward loyalty and not treat me as a customer as the enemy.

  2. I am not a frequent traveler, but I always look for Hyatts first now. I wish they had more presence in Israel.

  3. “As you can see from this chart, only Hyatt Ziva Puerto Vallarta has changed pricing, going from 20,000 points per night to 25,000 points per night. Hyatt tells me, though, that Hyatt Ziva Puerto Vallarta will be moving to Category B at 20,000 points in the next week.”

    I know the first part is correct, but did you mean a different hotel for the second part? Between it being odd for a hotel to move categories for exactly one week of bookings and you not saying it will be moving *back*, it sounds like you meant a different Ziva/Zilara resort.

  4. I have to give Hyatt a lot of credit here. My first instinct is to wonder whether assigning existing all-inclusives to a new award chart would be an opportunity to raise the price of redemptions. Surely at most programs it would be! And they have not done this here.

    LOL.Of course you would always give Hyatt a lot of credit even none is deserved, like for this move that clearly augurs a devaluation. As @GUWonder just wrote above, you should have written, “And they have not [YET] done this here”, because I am fairly certain that another devaluation is just around the corner…

    Some may remember that when Hyatt released their most recent seasonal award chart, I was surprised that the highest standard award cost was not 50K WoH points/night, as that value would have exactly matched Hilton’s new highest award rate of 150K HH points/night (50K WoH * 3HH/1WoH = 150K HH). I had that expectation because Hyatt has religiously adjusted their highest award rate to be ~1/3 of Hilton’s (an example of a points currency “peg”).

    Well, das ist es. Hyatt’s highest standard award rate is now 50K WoH points per night, i.e., exactly the same as Hilton’s 150K HH points/night, as I’d expected, which therefore opens the door wide for 50K WoH points/night to become the highest award rate also at non-all-inclusive properties.

    Just you watch…

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