Free and Almost Free (After Rebate) from Circuit City

Belkin Single-Outlet Surge Protector: $10 – $10 rebate Philips 700MB/80-Minute CD-Rs (100-Pack): $20 – $20 rebate Belkin F5D72304 802.11g Wireless Router: $65 – $57 rebate Belkin F5D7000 802.11g Wireless Desktop Adapter: $45 – $40 rebate Belkin F5D7010 802.11g Wireless Notebook Adapter: $45 – $40 rebate Remember that if you go to Circuit City via a mileage mall, you earn miles for your purchases based on the original (not after-rebate) price. I recommend the AAdvantage Mall because they’re giving double miles for purchases using Mastercard plus Circuit City is a featured merchant for the threshold bonus of up to 10,000 miles. Free after rebate items are a great way to earn those miles.

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British Airways sales

British Airways is running a 3 day sale on business class (from today through Sunday) from $2000 roundtrip. Through December 2nd there’s also a sale on coach which includes a London stopover on the way to another European destination along with two nights hotel in Lodon.

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I hate marketing doublespeak

qantas
Nov 25 2004

The only thing I hate more than devaluing points is being lied to. It’s laughable enough when Qantas describes the gutting of its award chart as “rebalancing.” But now they explain the end of mileage upgrades on discount fares as a way to support its most “loyal” customers. The changes would give “more availability to those business and first class fares rather than just somebody who books a one-off and uses the very bottom, cheapest fare and then upgrades”. “Because it is a loyalty program we’re rewarding those obviously more loyal to us,” the spokesman said. So Qantas is doing this because full fare paying passengers have been unable to buy business and first class tickets? I buy that they define loyalty as high revenue rather than high frequency or fidelity to a single airline.…

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Why you should keep earning miles, in spite of rising award prices

Several days ago I offered a long discussion of why I believe that frequent flyer awards will get more expensive over time, and why the best strategy is to “burn as you earn” rather than building up large balances. I also said, though, that the programs remain a good value and well worth participating in. Several readers asked if this wasn’t a contradiction. I actually believe both simultaneously. Award prices are going to go up over time, so the value of previously earned and banked miles will be diluted. At the same time it’s easier to earn new miles than ever before (part of why prices will go up in the first place) so it may not be any harder or take any longer to earn awards under new reward charts. A decade ago you…

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Qantas Guts its Frequent Flyer Program

qantas
Nov 24 2004

The Sydney Morning Herald is reporting that Qantas has gutted its frequent flyer program. First, the minor positives: some short-haul awards, such as Sydney-Melbourne in Coach, will become less expensive (20,000 points down to 16,000 points). They’re also introducing one-way awards and the ability to transfer points to eligible family members. Alas, those are the limits of the positives. Upgrades can no longer be confirmed at booking — they’re day of departure only — and they’re no longer available on discount fares, either. Elimination of upgrade credits. Instead members will receive 5000 points for every 450 Status credits earned. An increased cost for many premium class awards. Business class from Sydney to Los Angeles and Sydney to Singapore each went up 20%. First class from Sydney to Heathrow went up 28%. First class from Sydney…

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Kafkesque

airplane
Nov 23 2004

Steven Aftergood writes in Slate about the growth in rules dubbed “Sensitive Security Information” as a result of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 — government rules that we have to follow but aren’t allowed to know the details of. “Before the Law stands a doorkeeper” begins Franz Kafka’s famous parable, which tells of a man who seeks “admittance to the Law” but who is denied access by the doorkeeper—something he did not expect. The Law, he thinks, “should surely be accessible at all times and to everyone.” Federal employees can’t be prosecuted for revealing the contents of such information (only fired), but they’ve been threatened with prosecution nonetheless. And the TSA has used federal funding as a carrot and stick to impose secrecy rules on local police departments. “If I hadn’t seen this contract…

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